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Lenkeranschluss

English translation: axle guide stay

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15:20 Jul 9, 2008
German to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / Locomotives
German term or phrase: Lenkeranschluss
There are a number of different types of this, with different (unexplained) abbreviations:

LENKERANSCHLUSZ SP.G.
LENKERANSCHLUSZ W.G.
LENKERANSCHLUSZ,BEARB. SP.G.
LENKERANSCHLUSZ,BEARB. W.G.
LENKERANSCHLUSZ,ROHER

Any ideas/info welcome!
David Williams
Germany
Local time: 09:20
English translation:axle guide stay
Explanation:
The term "Lenkeranschluss" on its own means nothing whatever to me; I think it is a corruption of "ACHSlenkeranschluss", although the "...anschluss" bit bothers me too - that isn't generally used in railway jargon. So I'd say it's probably the stay/bracket/fixture on the chassis for the "axle guide". The "Lenkerhebel" is then likely to be the whole thing, "vst." presumably meaning "vollständig", although I'd prefer to see it called just the "Achslenker".

It may come as something of a shock to many to realise railway vehicles are steered - or more accurately "guided" - round curves. If they weren't, the wear on wheel tyres would be enormous, and speed on curves would need to be far more severely restricted than it is.

No great show of confidence here, I'm afraid, largely due to the lack of context - but you know all about that anyway....

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Note added at 54 mins (2008-07-09 16:14:53 GMT)
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And BTW, I'm sorry, but I cannot find a credible definition for either of those darned abbreviations...

I can only suggest that "bearb." is "bearbeitet", or machined, and "roh" is "unmachined". Doesn't seem to tally with the top entry, though...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2008-07-10 08:24:15 GMT)
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Sorry, David, damit ist mein Latein echt zu Ende...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2008-07-10 08:54:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I see yours has only just begun...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 hrs (2008-07-10 09:31:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I'm not laughing...just impressed.
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 09:20
Grading comment
Very many thanks. Sorry for the delay in closing the question! I'm not convinced that ship terminologiy is necessarily applicable here, hence no gloss entry.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2axle guide stayDavid Moore


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
axle guide stay


Explanation:
The term "Lenkeranschluss" on its own means nothing whatever to me; I think it is a corruption of "ACHSlenkeranschluss", although the "...anschluss" bit bothers me too - that isn't generally used in railway jargon. So I'd say it's probably the stay/bracket/fixture on the chassis for the "axle guide". The "Lenkerhebel" is then likely to be the whole thing, "vst." presumably meaning "vollständig", although I'd prefer to see it called just the "Achslenker".

It may come as something of a shock to many to realise railway vehicles are steered - or more accurately "guided" - round curves. If they weren't, the wear on wheel tyres would be enormous, and speed on curves would need to be far more severely restricted than it is.

No great show of confidence here, I'm afraid, largely due to the lack of context - but you know all about that anyway....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 54 mins (2008-07-09 16:14:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And BTW, I'm sorry, but I cannot find a credible definition for either of those darned abbreviations...

I can only suggest that "bearb." is "bearbeitet", or machined, and "roh" is "unmachined". Doesn't seem to tally with the top entry, though...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2008-07-10 08:24:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, David, damit ist mein Latein echt zu Ende...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2008-07-10 08:54:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I see yours has only just begun...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 hrs (2008-07-10 09:31:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I'm not laughing...just impressed.

David Moore
Local time: 09:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 764
Grading comment
Very many thanks. Sorry for the delay in closing the question! I'm not convinced that ship terminologiy is necessarily applicable here, hence no gloss entry.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you! Other entries in the list say: "* SP.G." = "OPP.AS DRAWN" and "* W.G." = "AS DRAWN", which I presume is "wie gezeichnet".

Asker: Ad astra per aspera.

Asker: In virtute sunt multi ascensus. Aspirat primo Fortuna labori. Nullum magnum ingenium sine mixtura dementiae fuit.

Asker: Quid rides?...Aspirat primo Fortuna labori. Amoto quaeramus seria ludo.

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Changes made by editors
Jul 9, 2008 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Term askedLENKERANSCHLUSZ » Lenkeranschluss


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