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Riss (Löwen)

English translation: kill, prey

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Riss (Raubtier)
English translation:kill, prey
Entered by: Steffen Walter
Options:
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20:28 Jun 29, 2007
German to English translations [PRO]
Science - Zoology / Naturdokumentarfilm, Tiere
German term or phrase: Riss (Löwen)
"Die überlegenen Jäger [Löwen] am Riss, umgeben von Hyänen, die auf ein paar Brocken ihrer Beute hoffen"

und auch hier (http://www.zoo-koeln.de/index.php?id=416)

"In den offenen Savannen Afrikas ist die gemeinsame Jagd erfolgreicher. In der Regel wird die Jagd allein von den Löwinnen ausgeübt. Am Riss frisst jedoch der Rudelführer zuerst."

Wie kann man "Riss" in diesem Zusammenhang übersetzen?
Armin Prediger
Local time: 01:40
Kill
Explanation:
kill as noun is the actual "Jagdbeute" of the predator. "Reissen" = erlegen, zur Strecke bringen (hunting language)
Selected response from:

Christine Slattery
Local time: 19:40
Grading comment
It was difficult making this decision as both terms are perfectly suitable and I used both terms in the actual translation. Ideally I would have liked to split the points. Since I had to decide on one, however, I chose this one because it is slightly more specific.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Kill
Christine Slattery
4prey
Frosty


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Kill


Explanation:
kill as noun is the actual "Jagdbeute" of the predator. "Reissen" = erlegen, zur Strecke bringen (hunting language)


    Reference: http://www.fotosearch.com/CRT711/03apr/
    Reference: http://www.desertdelta.co.za/dds-news-from-the-camps.html
Christine Slattery
Local time: 19:40
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
It was difficult making this decision as both terms are perfectly suitable and I used both terms in the actual translation. Ideally I would have liked to split the points. Since I had to decide on one, however, I chose this one because it is slightly more specific.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gillian Scheibelein: absolutely
9 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  Cetacea: indeed.
17 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  monbuckland
19 hrs
  -> thanks
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
prey


Explanation:
According to Websters: 1. Any animal seized by another for food.

So, it`s prey both before and after it gets killed.

Frosty
Local time: 02:40
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cetacea: True, but like you say, "prey" might still be alive, while a "Riss" is definitely dead.
17 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Jul 4, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/136296">Armin Prediger's</a> old entry - "Riss (Raubtier)" » "Kill, prey"
Jun 30, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Science
Field (specific)Biology (-tech,-chem,micro-) » Zoology


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