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Gamskitz

English translation: chamois kid

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:Gamskitz
English translation:chamois kid
Entered by: Helen Shiner
Options:
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11:53 Feb 21, 2009
German to English translations [PRO]
Science - Zoology / Animal native to Austria
German term or phrase: Gamskitz
Hi everyone,

Working on a marketing initiative focused on Kitzbuehel. The term I am struggling with is "Gamskitz", which is the symbol of Kitzbuehel (Tyrol, Austria). This animal only exists in Europe and New Zealand. The correct translation for "Gams" is chamois. However, we are talking about the young Gams, the "baby". There's much discussion that we have found as to what a Gamskitz is in English, and there's no consensus.
Ergo, the question: "What do you call a young chamois"?

So far, we have found:
simply "calf" which is of course correct for a young mammal, but not specific enough
"kid", which again leaves the species out
"young chamois"
"baby chamois"

Client has thus far used "chamois", which leaves the part that the Gams is a young one completely out. I've been researching on hunting sites (yikes), etc., but have yet to come up with a term that I really like.

I am really looking forward to hearing any comments and insight.

Judy Jenner
Judy Jenner
United States
Local time: 10:01
chamois kid
Explanation:
Young Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) are vulnerable to golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), while adults are probably eaten only as carrion. Here I report the observation of predation by a golden eagle on an Alpine chamois kid and the attempt at female defensive behaviour. During the eagle attack, the females of the herd surrounded their kids and tried to protect them with their horns and bodies. However, the defensive behaviour was unsuccessful and the eagle flew away with a kid. This observation may be consistent with the hypothesis of herd defensive behaviour in the Alpine chamois related to female sociality.
http://www.springerlink.com/content/p523428mp3w87163/

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Note added at 9 mins (2009-02-21 12:02:51 GMT)
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http://books.google.com/books?id=cuhNr47qfG4C&pg=PA16&lpg=PA...

Finally, T. ovis was the theileria less frequently found and restricted to a Catalonian chamois kid that died from pneumonia.
http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/para/abstract.00006407-20070300...

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Note added at 10 mins (2009-02-21 12:04:15 GMT)
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And here you have a picture of one:

http://www.mountainman.co.nz/gallery.php?imageID=55

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Note added at 50 mins (2009-02-21 12:44:09 GMT)
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http://chestofbooks.com/animals/W-H-G-Kingston/Stories-of-An...

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Note added at 56 mins (2009-02-21 12:50:19 GMT)
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It seems that the young of an antelope is generally called a calf. Perhaps given the relatedness of the chamois to this family, you would be correct in calling it a calf, too.

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Note added at 58 mins (2009-02-21 12:52:15 GMT)
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This chamois web-site has calf:
http://www.thewebsiteofeverything.com/animals/mammals/Artiod...

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Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-21 12:59:07 GMT)
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It might also be worth noting that the leather from a goat's young is called 'kid leather' whereas that from a chamois's young is called 'calf leather' - there are many, many ghits that will confirm this.

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Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-21 14:16:55 GMT) Post-grading
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Thanks for the points, Judy - and to my peers for supporting links.
Selected response from:

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:01
Grading comment
Thank you, I will definitely go with this answer. And agreed with previous -- a chamois is not in the deer family, but is a goatlike antelope. Thanks for all the great input. It makes me sad that anyone wants to hunt these cuties!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +7chamois kid
Helen Shiner
4 +2chamois fawn
swisstell
3 +2"Kitz" - a young chamois
Lesley Robertson M.A. Hons. Dip Trans IoLET
Summary of reference entries provided
Or calf
Kim Metzger

  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
chamois fawn


Explanation:
a chamois is part of the deer family and deer youngsters are called FAWNS, not kids or such.



Stock Photography of chamois - fawn standing / Rupicapra rupicapra ... chamois - fawn standing / Rupicapra rupicapra stock photography by Juniors Bildarchiv. 139070 Fotosearch Stock Photography and Stock Footage helps you find ...
www.fotosearch.com/JNB006/139070/ -

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Note added at 25 mins (2009-02-21 12:19:46 GMT)
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HuntingNet.com Photo Gallery chamois doe and fawn - 1shot 2 kills. chamois buck. first fox this year. polecat. first marten. chamois fawn. 2008 Season. Back porch beasts! 8pt. ...
www.huntingnet.com/gallery/?s=r - 91k

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Note added at 27 mins (2009-02-21 12:20:53 GMT)
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One chamois fawn could be caught alive, one young female chamois and one 9year-old male ibex were shot in the fields. These 3 animals were submitted for ...
library.vetmed.fu-berlin.de/resources/global/contents/VET164623/EAZWV/Chester%20PDF/Microsoft%20Word%20-%20Degiorgis.pdf

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 19:01
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks! However, a chamois is not in the deer family (Reh). A chamois is part of the antelope family, so it can't be a fawn, because a fawn is a young Reh -- different family. We'd originally erroneously thought that, too (and used "fawn"), and were quickly corrected by the client and informed of our "Denkfehler". Funny that you came up with the same thing. Thanks for your input!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Manuela Junghans
9 mins
  -> danke, Manuela

agree  David Hollywood: spot on Swiss :)
13 mins
  -> thanks,David

agree  Stephen Sadie: www.exploringnature.org/db/detail.php?dbID=44&detID=579 - 9k - Im Cache - Ähnliche Seiten
14 mins
  -> thank you, Stephen

disagree  Cetacea: Chamois are not members of the deer family. For one thing, deer have antlers, while chamois have horns. They belong to the family of the Bovidae.// No, it's not. Copying other people's errors on the Web doesn't make them right.
1 hr
  -> it is still a FAWN
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
"Kitz" - a young chamois


Explanation:
This seems to be the most commonly used term rather than kid or fawn, although they are equally correct. I would avoid "calf" and "baby". Why not gloss at the beginning of the text, e.g. The symbol of Kitzbühel is the "Kitz" - a young chamois..." and then use Kitz afterwards


    Reference: http://www.treknature.com/gallery/Europe/Germany/photo182942...
    Reference: http://www.montagnes2002.ch/exp/enc/living/wildlife/chamois....
Lesley Robertson M.A. Hons. Dip Trans IoLET
Austria
Local time: 19:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Stephen Sadie: also a neat solution
6 mins
  -> thanks stephen!!

agree  Cetacea: An elegant solution to the problem.
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
chamois kid


Explanation:
Young Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) are vulnerable to golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), while adults are probably eaten only as carrion. Here I report the observation of predation by a golden eagle on an Alpine chamois kid and the attempt at female defensive behaviour. During the eagle attack, the females of the herd surrounded their kids and tried to protect them with their horns and bodies. However, the defensive behaviour was unsuccessful and the eagle flew away with a kid. This observation may be consistent with the hypothesis of herd defensive behaviour in the Alpine chamois related to female sociality.
http://www.springerlink.com/content/p523428mp3w87163/

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2009-02-21 12:02:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://books.google.com/books?id=cuhNr47qfG4C&pg=PA16&lpg=PA...

Finally, T. ovis was the theileria less frequently found and restricted to a Catalonian chamois kid that died from pneumonia.
http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/para/abstract.00006407-20070300...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2009-02-21 12:04:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And here you have a picture of one:

http://www.mountainman.co.nz/gallery.php?imageID=55

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2009-02-21 12:44:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://chestofbooks.com/animals/W-H-G-Kingston/Stories-of-An...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 56 mins (2009-02-21 12:50:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It seems that the young of an antelope is generally called a calf. Perhaps given the relatedness of the chamois to this family, you would be correct in calling it a calf, too.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 58 mins (2009-02-21 12:52:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This chamois web-site has calf:
http://www.thewebsiteofeverything.com/animals/mammals/Artiod...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-21 12:59:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It might also be worth noting that the leather from a goat's young is called 'kid leather' whereas that from a chamois's young is called 'calf leather' - there are many, many ghits that will confirm this.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-21 14:16:55 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks for the points, Judy - and to my peers for supporting links.

Helen Shiner
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you, I will definitely go with this answer. And agreed with previous -- a chamois is not in the deer family, but is a goatlike antelope. Thanks for all the great input. It makes me sad that anyone wants to hunt these cuties!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Hollywood: on the button too Helen :) and a quick response :)
32 mins
  -> Thank you, David

neutral  Stephen Sadie: although this term is to be found; I believe it is not correct
42 mins
  -> Maybe, Stephen, I am happy with it, if academics are using it in their work - see my links, and it is certainly more correct than 'fawn'. Young chamois may be an alternative.

agree  John Speese: I would agree with "kid", as I too found it on several web sites, including one for the mountain goat of the US, which I believe is a close relative.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, John - given Cetacea's link, I'm definitely sticking with kid! You are clearly spot on re the mountain goat.

agree  Inge Meinzer: Great research and a lovely picture to boot :-)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Inge - certainly a cute little chap, isn't it?

agree  Cetacea: "chamois kid" is definitely the correct solution. Chamois are not antelopes. Together with e.g. Mountain Goats (as pointed out by John), they belong to the rupicaprini. See e.g. http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/tei-Bio13Tuat02-t1-body-d3...
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Cetacea - great link; that just about nails it, I would have thought.

agree  franglish
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, franglish

agree  Derek Gill Franßen
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Derek

agree  Kim Metzger: A good argument could also be made for "calf".
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kim - it certainly looks that way to me, too.
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Reference comments


6 hrs
Reference: Or calf

Reference information:
Results 1 - 10 of about 333 English and German pages for "chamois kid".
Results 1 - 10 of about 691 English and German pages for "chamois calf".
The chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) is a goat-like animal native to the Carpathian Mountains of Romania, the European Alps, the Gran Sasso region of the central Italian Apennines, the Tatra Mountains, the Balkans, parts of Turkey, and the Caucasus.
Female chamois and their young live in herds; adult males tend to live solitarily for most of the year. During the rut (late November/early December in Europe, May in New Zealand), males engage in fierce battles for the attention of unbred females. An impregnated female undergoes a gestation period of 20 weeks, after which a single kid is born. The kid is fully grown by three years of age.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamois

The Chamois is a goat like animal, but it belongs in its own genus and is more closely related to the Goral than to the goats. The Chamois is superbly adapted to the mountains having particularly soft hooves which help it to grasp to the rocks on the mountains where it lives. It also has large dew claws which help it to clasp to slopes when descending.
http://www.geocities.com/magicgoatman/wildgoatindex.html

Goral
Reproduction: Gestation lasts about six months, after which the female delivers a single calf.
http://www.americazoo.com/goto/index/mammals/414.htm

Thirteen Chinese goral (Nemorhaedus goral arnouxianus) (five males and eight females) were each given 0.8 mg of melengestrol acetate orally in pelleted food for 224 days. The previous breeding season, six of the eight females calved (two were immature). No calf was born during the treatment season.
The Chinese goral (Nemorhaedus goral arnouxianus) is a seasonally breeding, goatlike bovid that breeds readily in captivity. Wild gorals live in steep rocky terrain in groups of up to 14.12 Females over 3 yr calve yearly throughout their reproductive life.

http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.1638/1042-7260(2000)031[02...

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44
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Changes made by editors
Feb 21, 2009 - Changes made by Helen Shiner:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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