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labis

English translation: labrys, the double-headed axe of ancient Crete

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Greek (Ancient) term or phrase:λάβρυς
English translation:labrys, the double-headed axe of ancient Crete
Entered by: Nick Lingris
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19:57 May 23, 2005
Greek (Ancient) to English translations [PRO]
History / Archaeology
Greek (Ancient) term or phrase: labis
Dear translators,
The situation is following -we have the competition about Crete here in Latvia, and there is a question what does the Greek word "labis" mean in Latvian (English). Versions are the following- cage, cave, fortress, double-edged axe, double-edged sword, treasury??? Please, help!!! The answer is needed within an hour!! hopeless situation.....
Inguna Hausmane
Latvia
Local time: 16:59
the double-headed axe of ancient Crete
Explanation:
The double-headed axe of ancient Crete.

http://encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com/Labrys
Selected response from:

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Grading comment
Thanks a lot!! If I win the competition I will go to Crete(that's the prize), I would like it very much but if they gonna ask such questions I am not sure if it happens...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6the double-headed axe of ancient Crete
Nick Lingris


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
labrys
the double-headed axe of ancient Crete


Explanation:
The double-headed axe of ancient Crete.

http://encyclopedia.laborlawtalk.com/Labrys

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks a lot!! If I win the competition I will go to Crete(that's the prize), I would like it very much but if they gonna ask such questions I am not sure if it happens...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: It should be "lavrys" (λάβρυς), shouldn't it?//Yes, you may. However, I am afraid you may brag about everything but one thing...//Ok. By the way, I edited the question fields and language pair.
2 mins
  -> May I brag that I was born just 7 kilometres away from Cnossus? // In Greek it is 'lavrys', but the Anglosaxons spell it 'labrys'.

agree  Valentini Mellas
16 mins
  -> Thank you, Valentini. Probably the quickest and easiest points I'll ever make (apart from playing tavli with my wife).

agree  Catherine Christaki
10 hrs

agree  Evdoxia R.
12 hrs

agree  Betty Revelioti
13 hrs

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: Agreed, but the word is in fact not Greek at all; it derives from Lydian, according to Plutarch ('Moralia', 2.302a, where he equates it with 'pelekys', 'axe'). The axe is prominent in Minoan religous iconology and it may well derive from Anatolia.
59 days
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Changes made by editors
May 23, 2005 - Changes made by Vicky Papaprodromou:
Field (specific)General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters » History
Field (write-in)(none) » Archaeology
May 23, 2005 - Changes made by Vicky Papaprodromou:
Language pairGreek to English » Greek (Ancient) to English


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