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dobhi ka gadha na ghar ka na ghat ka

English translation: See explanation

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Hindi term or phrase:dobhi ka gadha na ghar ka na ghat ka
English translation:See explanation
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05:52 May 14, 2005
Hindi to English translations [Non-PRO]
Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc. / Ethics
Hindi term or phrase: dobhi ka gadha na ghar ka na ghat ka
laundry man
Ramesh
See explanation
Explanation:
In fact, this Hindi proverb should read as:

Dhobii kA KUTTA na ghar kA, nA ghAt kA

Actually GadhA i.e. donkey is very useful for the washerman because it takes the whole bunch of clothes to the riverside on its back and then brings them back!

Sometimes, it becomes very difficult to find an idiom or proverb expressing the same meaning in a figurative manner in a different language. In this case, we are left with no other option but to translate it literally. I think that this proverb may be translated in English as:

The washerman's dog belongs neither to hourse nor to waterside.

Some equivalent English proverbs from a source:

Neither fish nor fowl
A rolling stone gathers no moss
One who rides two boats is sure to be overthrown

Another close English proverb:

A dog who runs after two bones catches neither

Please checker whether one of the above suggestions fits in your text.


Selected response from:

chopra_2002
India
Local time: 09:15
Grading comment
Thank you .. I think it is the correct explanation that fits to my Question.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5Some belonging to or having affiliation to nowhere.
Dr. Rajesh Kumar
5Jack of all trades but master of none.
Balasubramaniam L.
4See explanation
chopra_2002


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Some belonging to or having affiliation to nowhere.


Explanation:
This is an idiom.

Dr. Rajesh Kumar
India
Local time: 09:15
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
See explanation


Explanation:
In fact, this Hindi proverb should read as:

Dhobii kA KUTTA na ghar kA, nA ghAt kA

Actually GadhA i.e. donkey is very useful for the washerman because it takes the whole bunch of clothes to the riverside on its back and then brings them back!

Sometimes, it becomes very difficult to find an idiom or proverb expressing the same meaning in a figurative manner in a different language. In this case, we are left with no other option but to translate it literally. I think that this proverb may be translated in English as:

The washerman's dog belongs neither to hourse nor to waterside.

Some equivalent English proverbs from a source:

Neither fish nor fowl
A rolling stone gathers no moss
One who rides two boats is sure to be overthrown

Another close English proverb:

A dog who runs after two bones catches neither

Please checker whether one of the above suggestions fits in your text.




chopra_2002
India
Local time: 09:15
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
Grading comment
Thank you .. I think it is the correct explanation that fits to my Question.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tejinder Soodan: Washerman's dog means an idle or worthless person, but washeman's donkey does't mean the same
13 mins
  -> Thanks for your observation.In fact, there is no Hindi proverb as Dhobi ka GADHA ...whereas Dhobi ka kutta.... is a well known and famous proverb and I think that the asker has written Gadha instead of Kutta due to oversight. Hence the above suggestion.

neutral  Balasubramaniam L.: Yes should be dog. In fact there is a proverb in English which comes close in meaning to thi proverb. See my answer. A rolling stone... has a slightly different meaning, and so do the boat one and the dog one.
2 hrs
  -> You are right to a good extent.I've already mentioned that it is not always possible to locate a proverb communicating the same meaning.Sometimes we've got similar proverbs-Much ado about nothing-KhodA pahaD niklA chuhA, but such instances are rare.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Jack of all trades but master of none.


Explanation:
There is an exact equivalent to this proverb in English:
Jack of all trades but master of none.

Meaning: A person who is respected no where.

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Note added at 3 hrs 46 mins (2005-05-14 09:39:08 GMT)
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As langclinic has pointed out, the correct form of this proverb is:

Dhobi ka kutta, na ghar ka na ghat ka.


Balasubramaniam L.
India
Local time: 09:15
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  chopra_2002: This English proverb has got nothing to do with respect. In fact it means someone who is good at many things but excellent at none. This does not seem to convey the connotations of the Hindi proverb.
10 mins
  -> If you know many trades but none of them well, you won't command much respect, just like the dhobi's kutta :)
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Voters for reclassification
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PRO (2): chopra_2002, Balasubramaniam L.


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