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faugh- an -ballagh

English translation: clear the way

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23:43 Aug 22, 2002
Irish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Irish term or phrase: faugh- an -ballagh
There is an Irish band that sings of Honoring those that have sacraficed for the good of the people. The chorus goes: Come on rally round this brave and valiant cause with tradition pride honor at it's at it's core.With swords drawn to defend stood these noble hearted men FAUGH - AN- BALLAGH, clear the way, me boys.
Cody Tormanen
English translation:clear the way
Explanation:
Misspelling: it really is FÁG (leave) a (the) bealac/bealach (way, road, path)

INFORMATION

The first poem, FAG A BEALAC, appears in The Spirit of the Nation, an 1843 compilation of poems and songs that had previously appeared in The Nation newspaper. The Nation was founded in Ireland in 1842 by Charles Gavan Duffy as an educational journal, to create and foster public opinion for nationality for Ireland. A member of the Young Ireland movement and a fine poet in his own right, Gavan Duffy stated in an 1843 edition of The Nation, "We furnish political songs to stimulate flagging zeal, or create it where it does not exist." In tribute to his success in this endeavor, Gavan Duffy was jailed in the mid 1840's with Daniel O'Connell and unsuccessfully tried for treason. The Nation is the original publication source for some of the Irish nationalist songs such as "O'Donnell Aboo" (also known as "O Domhnaill Abu" or "The Clanconnell Warsong") and "A Nation Once Again", that are popular with reenactors today. The Spirit of the Nation attributes authorship of this work to ABlack Northern@. Indeed, all authors in AThe Spirit@ appear as nom de plumes, or simply initials, ostensibly to avoid certain identification in the event that their works were found particularly offensive by the authorities.

This poem also appeared in the October 12, 1861 edition of The Pilot. One of the nation's leading Irish Catholic newspapers, The Pilot was published weekly and served as an official organ of the Archdiocese of Boston. Both this republication and the second poem presented in this article were culled from a review of the editions of The Pilot published between April 1861 and December 1862. While the war cry appears often in news stories and recruiting advertisements, these were the only two works during that period to set the Gaelic war cry to rhyme. The Pilot identifies the author of this work as Gavan Duffy, himself, and alters the spelling to @Fag an Bealac@ with no dot over the Ac@. Other differences between the two publications are minor.

Fag a Bealac.+

A National Hymn, chaunted in full chorus at the Symposiacs of the Editors and Contributors of "The Nation."

I.

"Hope no more for fatherland;

All its ranks are thinned or broken;"

Long a base and coward band

Recreant words like these have spoken;

But We preach a land awoken,

A land of courage true and tried

As your fears are false and hollow:

Slaves and dastards, stand aside!

Knaves and traitors, FAG A BEALAC !



II.

Know, ye suffering brethren ours,

Might is strong, but Right is stronger;

Saxon wiles or Saxon powers

Can enslave our land no longer,

Than your own dissensions wrong her:

Be ye one in might and mind -

Quit the mire where Cravens wallow -

And your foes shall flee like wind

From your fearless FAG A BEALAC !



III.

Thus the mighty Multitude

Speak in accents hoarse with sorrow -

"We are fallen, but unsubdued;

"Show us whence we Hope may borrow,

"And we'll fight your fight to-morrow.

"Be but cautious, true, and brave,

"Where you lead us we will follow;

'Hill and valley, rock and wave,

"Shall echo back our FAG A BEALAC !



IV.

Fling our sunburst to the wind,

Studded o'er with names of glory;

Worth, and wit, and might, and mind,



Poet young, and Patriot hoary,

Long shall make it shine in story,

Close your ranks-the moment's come-

Now, ye men of Ireland, follow;

Friends of Freedom, charge them home!

Foes of freedom, FAG A BEALAC !

______

+FAG A BEALAC, "Clear the road!", commonly but erroneously spelt Faugh a Ballagh, was the cry which the clans of Connaught and Munster used in faction fights to come through a fair with high hearts and smashing shillelahs. The regiments raised in the South and West took their old shout with them to the Continent. The 88th, or Connaught Rangers, from their use of it, went generally by the name of "The Faugh a Ballagh Boys. " "Nothing," says Napier, in his History of the Peninsular War, - "nothing so startled the French soldiery as the wild yell with which the Irish regiments sprung to the charge; and never was that haughty and intolerant shout raised in battle, but a charge, swift as thought and fatal as flame, came with it, like a rushing incarnation of FAG A BEALAC !

The Spirit of the Nation, p.11; pub. James Duffy; Dublin; 1843.

(In the republication of this poem and footnote in The Pilot credit is given to the 87th regiment, the Royal Irish Fusileers, as "The Faugh a Ballagh Boys".)

http://216.239.51.100/search?q=cache:HXRE3mGPD5YC:www.28thma...


ALSO FROM GOOGLE

On August 1st, 1900 the tramline from south Mossman to Port Douglas was opened. The 2ft, narrow gauge tramway was to transport passengers, goods & bagged sugar between Mossman and the wharf at Port Douglas. The original loco -"Faugh a Ballagh" meaning "Clear the Way" in Gaelic carried more than 23,000 passengers over 5,800 miles in it's first year.

Regimental Battle Cry : Faugh A Ballagh

The Regimental Battle Cry "Faugh A Ballagh" was first used during the American Civil War. It is a Gaelic phrase meaning "Clear The Way". While there is great debate within the unit as to how to pronounce this phrase properly, our latest research indicates that it is said "Fah-g Ahn BAY-Lick

Selected response from:

xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 07:47
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +5clear the wayxxxLia Fail


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
clear the way


Explanation:
Misspelling: it really is FÁG (leave) a (the) bealac/bealach (way, road, path)

INFORMATION

The first poem, FAG A BEALAC, appears in The Spirit of the Nation, an 1843 compilation of poems and songs that had previously appeared in The Nation newspaper. The Nation was founded in Ireland in 1842 by Charles Gavan Duffy as an educational journal, to create and foster public opinion for nationality for Ireland. A member of the Young Ireland movement and a fine poet in his own right, Gavan Duffy stated in an 1843 edition of The Nation, "We furnish political songs to stimulate flagging zeal, or create it where it does not exist." In tribute to his success in this endeavor, Gavan Duffy was jailed in the mid 1840's with Daniel O'Connell and unsuccessfully tried for treason. The Nation is the original publication source for some of the Irish nationalist songs such as "O'Donnell Aboo" (also known as "O Domhnaill Abu" or "The Clanconnell Warsong") and "A Nation Once Again", that are popular with reenactors today. The Spirit of the Nation attributes authorship of this work to ABlack Northern@. Indeed, all authors in AThe Spirit@ appear as nom de plumes, or simply initials, ostensibly to avoid certain identification in the event that their works were found particularly offensive by the authorities.

This poem also appeared in the October 12, 1861 edition of The Pilot. One of the nation's leading Irish Catholic newspapers, The Pilot was published weekly and served as an official organ of the Archdiocese of Boston. Both this republication and the second poem presented in this article were culled from a review of the editions of The Pilot published between April 1861 and December 1862. While the war cry appears often in news stories and recruiting advertisements, these were the only two works during that period to set the Gaelic war cry to rhyme. The Pilot identifies the author of this work as Gavan Duffy, himself, and alters the spelling to @Fag an Bealac@ with no dot over the Ac@. Other differences between the two publications are minor.

Fag a Bealac.+

A National Hymn, chaunted in full chorus at the Symposiacs of the Editors and Contributors of "The Nation."

I.

"Hope no more for fatherland;

All its ranks are thinned or broken;"

Long a base and coward band

Recreant words like these have spoken;

But We preach a land awoken,

A land of courage true and tried

As your fears are false and hollow:

Slaves and dastards, stand aside!

Knaves and traitors, FAG A BEALAC !



II.

Know, ye suffering brethren ours,

Might is strong, but Right is stronger;

Saxon wiles or Saxon powers

Can enslave our land no longer,

Than your own dissensions wrong her:

Be ye one in might and mind -

Quit the mire where Cravens wallow -

And your foes shall flee like wind

From your fearless FAG A BEALAC !



III.

Thus the mighty Multitude

Speak in accents hoarse with sorrow -

"We are fallen, but unsubdued;

"Show us whence we Hope may borrow,

"And we'll fight your fight to-morrow.

"Be but cautious, true, and brave,

"Where you lead us we will follow;

'Hill and valley, rock and wave,

"Shall echo back our FAG A BEALAC !



IV.

Fling our sunburst to the wind,

Studded o'er with names of glory;

Worth, and wit, and might, and mind,



Poet young, and Patriot hoary,

Long shall make it shine in story,

Close your ranks-the moment's come-

Now, ye men of Ireland, follow;

Friends of Freedom, charge them home!

Foes of freedom, FAG A BEALAC !

______

+FAG A BEALAC, "Clear the road!", commonly but erroneously spelt Faugh a Ballagh, was the cry which the clans of Connaught and Munster used in faction fights to come through a fair with high hearts and smashing shillelahs. The regiments raised in the South and West took their old shout with them to the Continent. The 88th, or Connaught Rangers, from their use of it, went generally by the name of "The Faugh a Ballagh Boys. " "Nothing," says Napier, in his History of the Peninsular War, - "nothing so startled the French soldiery as the wild yell with which the Irish regiments sprung to the charge; and never was that haughty and intolerant shout raised in battle, but a charge, swift as thought and fatal as flame, came with it, like a rushing incarnation of FAG A BEALAC !

The Spirit of the Nation, p.11; pub. James Duffy; Dublin; 1843.

(In the republication of this poem and footnote in The Pilot credit is given to the 87th regiment, the Royal Irish Fusileers, as "The Faugh a Ballagh Boys".)

http://216.239.51.100/search?q=cache:HXRE3mGPD5YC:www.28thma...


ALSO FROM GOOGLE

On August 1st, 1900 the tramline from south Mossman to Port Douglas was opened. The 2ft, narrow gauge tramway was to transport passengers, goods & bagged sugar between Mossman and the wharf at Port Douglas. The original loco -"Faugh a Ballagh" meaning "Clear the Way" in Gaelic carried more than 23,000 passengers over 5,800 miles in it's first year.

Regimental Battle Cry : Faugh A Ballagh

The Regimental Battle Cry "Faugh A Ballagh" was first used during the American Civil War. It is a Gaelic phrase meaning "Clear The Way". While there is great debate within the unit as to how to pronounce this phrase properly, our latest research indicates that it is said "Fah-g Ahn BAY-Lick



xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 07:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

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