KudoZ home » Italian to English » Architecture

spioventi

English translation: gabled

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:a due spioventi
English translation:gabled
Entered by: Anthony Green
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:00 Mar 15, 2007
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Architecture / Romanesque cathedral
Italian term or phrase: spioventi
It's clear that the word refers to a sloping structure, and the cathedral itself can be seen in http://www.cartantica.it/content/Collabrecensioni/Cattedrale... where the "spioventi" give the cathedral its unique shape... but here is the phrase - I'd like to use a word that fits in nicely with "racchiudono" if possible:

"Ruvo, inoltre, offre la visita di una delle più note e interessanti cattedrali romaniche di Puglia, caratterizzata dall’insolito campanile e dagli spioventi, che racchiudono la facciata e il rosone, molto inclinati."
Anthony Green
Italy
Local time: 06:15
gable
Explanation:
Hi Anthony,

Spioventi does, as you rightly say, mean a sloping roof, so you could use that, or alternatively "pitches". However, looking at the photo, your text seems to refer to the upper part of the roof, which encloses the rose window. I'd call that a gable.

HTH
Sarah
Selected response from:

Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 06:15
Grading comment
Thanks Sarah for giving me the term I used, and of course a special mention to Danilo for such an in-depth analysis!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +1gable
Sarah Ponting
3steeply sloping roofxxxMaudarg
3 -1weatheredDanilo Carnevale


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
steeply sloping roof


Explanation:
I think this is a fairly elegant way of phrasing it, and *enclosing ...* would be a logical way of continuing.

The cathedral chapel was completed in 1856 and the cathedral foundation in 1888. ... The steeply sloping roof, buttressed by three pointed arch doorways, ...



    Reference: http://www.portlandlandmarks.org/churches_walking_tour.shtml
xxxMaudarg
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
gable


Explanation:
Hi Anthony,

Spioventi does, as you rightly say, mean a sloping roof, so you could use that, or alternatively "pitches". However, looking at the photo, your text seems to refer to the upper part of the roof, which encloses the rose window. I'd call that a gable.

HTH
Sarah

Sarah Ponting
Italy
Local time: 06:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23
Grading comment
Thanks Sarah for giving me the term I used, and of course a special mention to Danilo for such an in-depth analysis!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ivana UK: Garzanti translates "gabled" as "a due spioventi"
3 hrs

neutral  Danilo Carnevale: Scusa, ma in che contesto e riferito a cosa? Ivana, intendo la frase del dizionario in che contesto è messa??
4 hrs
  -> riferito alla foto, ovviamente!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
weathered


Explanation:
Viene solitamente usato in architettura

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2007-03-15 10:25:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, I misread the sentence.
This might help you, it's from Dizinario Zanichelli: "verge"
[EDIL] parte del tetto sporgente dal frontone
The edge of a sloping roof which projects over a gable.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 mins (2007-03-15 10:47:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Anthony, I've found this on Picchi Dictionary :
weathering - noun m. (arch.- edil.) "spiovente"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 55 mins (2007-03-15 10:55:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And here there are lots of references. I think WEATHERING is definitely the right term.
http://www.google.it/search?hl=it&q=weatherings cathedral&me...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-03-15 11:48:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, I do. Don't be mislead by the verb "racchiudono". The sentence is a bit intricate. Here they mean that, when you watch the front wall, the bell-tower an the weatherings enclose (racchiudono) this wall an the front window. It's to be thought about in a sort of pictorial way, not literally.


    Reference: http://www.google.it/search?hl=it&q=weathered+cathedral&meta...
Danilo Carnevale
Italy
Local time: 06:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi Danilo - thanks but unfortunately in this case it's not projecting over a gable at all: see the picture

Asker: yes, thanks Danilo - you're quite right about the term: the weathering is the upper surface of the sloping roof, but do you think the text is talking about that?

Asker: Danilo - thanks for doing all this work on my behalf! I think a certain amount of the confusion arises from the writer slightly misusing the term, but the main thing is that this is just a light tourist brochure attracting English-speaking people to stay in a trullo, and I for one wouldn't understand the technical term "weathering" if I read it, whereas "gable" I have known since I was a small boy


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sarah Ponting: weathered is an adjective, not a noun!
7 mins
  -> Yes, I misread. But you could always rephrase: ...and the weathered roof,..."
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search