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schiamazzi

English translation: racket, hullabaloo, rumpus, commotion, ecc.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:schiamazzi
English translation:racket, hullabaloo, rumpus, commotion, ecc.
Entered by: Aquamarine76
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10:53 Feb 14, 2007
Italian to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Italian term or phrase: schiamazzi
I know this means disturbances or noises in general (referring to night time) but had translated strani rumori for strange noises so not sure how to translate schiamazzi now. Any suggestions? Thanks


“Niente schiamazzi! niente strani rumori! Sono stata chiara?”
Aquamarine76
Ireland
Local time: 20:13
racket, hullabaloo, rumpus, commotion, ecc.
Explanation:
Your first stop ought to be the dictionary for schiamazzare/schiamazzo, and then an English thesaurus. Nonetheless, some possibilities are above.
Selected response from:

WendellR
Local time: 21:13
Grading comment
Thanks! Ill use a mix of the two. Thanks to all of you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2racket, hullabaloo, rumpus, commotion, ecc.WendellR
4No shouting/yelling/hollering/squawking! no strange noises! Did I make myself clear?
Rosanna Palermo
4disturbance of the peace/ breach of the peace> rowdy behaviourmanducci
3 +1racket
Gianluigi Desogus, PhD
4 -1"No din nor strange noises, d' ye understand? Right?"
Alessandro Zocchi
2 -1night dinsGAR


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
racket, hullabaloo, rumpus, commotion, ecc.


Explanation:
Your first stop ought to be the dictionary for schiamazzare/schiamazzo, and then an English thesaurus. Nonetheless, some possibilities are above.

WendellR
Local time: 21:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thanks! Ill use a mix of the two. Thanks to all of you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Pnina
36 mins

agree  tatyana000
57 mins
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
night dins


Explanation:
see:

http://urp2.comune.bologna.it/SportelloUnico/Informa2.nsf/0/...

cheers

GAR
Local time: 21:13
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 7

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  WendellR: Oops, should have said "that site is" a dreadful automatic translation and shouldn't be used as an example of correct English! Interesting what you say about "to din" as a verb; I'd never heard it, but the dictionary confirms that it exists.
59 mins
  -> I found "din=assordare" that's why I thought it could refer to "schiamazzo" as a noun...
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
racket


Explanation:
what about racket? I'm not a native speaker so I don't know if this is entirely suitable, but I've seen it used in this sense

Gianluigi Desogus, PhD
Portugal
Local time: 19:13
Native speaker of: Italian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  WendellR
59 mins
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
"No din nor strange noises, d' ye understand? Right?"


Explanation:
Just a suggestion!

I go on translating handbooks for oxygen therapy, so that this is quite a relax for my neurons...


!Suerte!

Ale

Alessandro Zocchi
Italy
Local time: 21:13
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  WendellR: The sense is right, but it isn't quite English. "Din" is a fairly 'high-register' word & perhaps not appropriate here; "d'ye" belongs in Dickens!
1 hr
  -> Thanks for the remark, I just wanted to render the sentence in a strange and "colourful" way, so as it is in my ears in Italian -see "schiamazzi" and "sono stata chiara"(from a native point of view).Next time I'll try with "Dost thou".. Have a nice day :D
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
disturbance of the peace/ breach of the peace> rowdy behaviour


Explanation:
It depends on the register: a formal complaint, legal case etc. If it involves the police or is a legal case, then disturbance or breach of the peace would be more appropriate. Rowdy behaviour would be more general usage.


    Reference: http://209.85.135.104/search?q=cache:HOTL0iL39qYJ:legal-dict...
manducci
Local time: 21:13
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
No shouting/yelling/hollering/squawking! no strange noises! Did I make myself clear?


Explanation:
schiamazzare in this case I think refers to shouting (also known as hollering) not general loud noises since it is followed by loud noises.
Sounds like someone admonishing children to me.
If you wanted to put some humor in it, you may translate as
"No squawking!..etc"

WordNet - Cite This Source squawk

noun
1. the noise of squawking; "she awoke to the squawk of chickens"; "the squawk of car horns"
2. informal terms for objecting; "I have a gripe about the service here" [syn: gripe]

verb
1. utter a harsh abrupt scream
2. complain; "What was he hollering about?" [syn: gripe]
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
squawk /skwɔk/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[skwawk] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–verb (used without object) 1. to utter a loud, harsh cry, as a duck or other fowl when frightened.
2. Informal. to complain loudly and vehemently.
–verb (used with object) 3. to utter or give forth with a squawk.
–noun 4. a loud, harsh cry or sound.
5. Informal. a loud, vehement complaint.
6. the black-crowned night heron.

See under night heron.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Origin: 1815–25; b. squall2 and hawk3]

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
squawk /skwɔk/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[skwawk] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–verb (used without object) 1. to utter a loud, harsh cry, as a duck or other fowl when frightened.
2. Informal. to complain loudly and vehemently.
–verb (used with object) 3. to utter or give forth with a squawk.
–noun 4. a loud, harsh cry or sound.
5. Informal. a loud, vehement complaint.
6. the black-crowned night heron.

See under night heron.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[Origin: 1815–25; b. squall2 and hawk3]
hol·ler1 /ˈhɒlər/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[hol-er] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–verb (used without object) 1. to cry aloud; shout; yell: Quit hollering into the phone.
–verb (used with object) 2. to shout or yell (something): He hollered insults back into the saloon.
–noun 3. a loud cry used to express pain or surprise, to attract attention, to call for help, etc.

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source

hol·ler 1 /ˈhɒlər/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[hol-er] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation

–verb (used without object) 1. to cry aloud; shout; yell:
Quit hollering into the phone.
–verb (used with object) 2. to shout or yell (something): He hollered insults back into the saloon.
–noun 3. a loud cry used to express pain or surprise, to attract attention, to call for help, etc.


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[Origin: 1690–1700, Americanism; var. of holla (see hallo)]


Rosanna Palermo
Local time: 14:13
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 59
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