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lì (here)

English translation: not to be translated

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:lì (here)
English translation:not to be translated
Entered by: maryrose
Options:
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02:59 Sep 16, 2007
Italian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / also used in legal field
Italian term or phrase: lì (here)
I just know this is one of those things that is going to make me feel a complete idiot, but ...

In documents, either at the beginning or at the end under the signature, eg,

Milano, lì .........................

or

Signature

.....................lì......................

At first I thought it was a typo for "il" meaning the date, but I've seen it often enough that it obvioiusly isn't. Can someone put me out of my misery please?
maryrose
Local time: 08:32
not to be translated
Explanation:
no typo; in Italian we sometimes use "li" in dates after the place and comma, and has not to be translated. It is less used nowadays.

ex.: Milano, lì 3 settembre 2007

Milan, 3rd September 2007


It means "there", but it has not to be translated.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2007-09-16 09:50:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note that you can find "li" without accent, which refers to "the"... second day of the first month, etc.

Ex:. Roma, lì 2 gennaio 2007

I often use "li" rather than "lì", when I translate official documents into Italian.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2007-09-16 13:43:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I reaffirm that both "lì" and "li" are used in Italian.
Selected response from:

Emanuela Galdelli
Italy
Local time: 01:02
Grading comment
Thanks again, Emanuela
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +8not to be translated
Emanuela Galdelli
5 +1not to be translatedmamacat


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lì (the)
not to be translated


Explanation:

Always check De Mauro, it's a mine of information!

art.det.m.pl.
1 LE i, gli: tornate a riveder li vostri liti (Dante), li due fratelli (Boccaccio), ovunque ella sdegnando li occhi gira (Petrarca)
2 TS burocr., nell’indicazione delle date nella corrispondenza e in documenti ufficiali, davanti al giorno del mese, eccetto il primo: Torino, li 20 giugno 1952
BTW, if it meant "here" it would be "qui"


    Reference: http://www.demauroparavia.it/63380
mamacat
Local time: 19:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: why repeat the same answer given 3 hours earlier?
3 hrs

agree  Alfredo Tutino
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
lì (in dates)
not to be translated


Explanation:
no typo; in Italian we sometimes use "li" in dates after the place and comma, and has not to be translated. It is less used nowadays.

ex.: Milano, lì 3 settembre 2007

Milan, 3rd September 2007


It means "there", but it has not to be translated.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2007-09-16 09:50:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note that you can find "li" without accent, which refers to "the"... second day of the first month, etc.

Ex:. Roma, lì 2 gennaio 2007

I often use "li" rather than "lì", when I translate official documents into Italian.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2007-09-16 13:43:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I reaffirm that both "lì" and "li" are used in Italian.

Emanuela Galdelli
Italy
Local time: 01:02
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Grading comment
Thanks again, Emanuela
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Emanuela - in fact I have been ignoring it, so it's good to know my instincts were right. Thank you!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mara Ballarini
58 mins
  -> thank you

agree  Lindsay Watts
3 hrs
  -> thank you, Lindsay

agree  James (Jim) Davis
3 hrs
  -> thank you, Jim

agree  Alessandra Renna
5 hrs
  -> grazie, Alessandra

agree  writeaway: but surely this shouldn't be classified under legal?/maybe it should be changed so it is in the right category for the glossary (if anyone else needs to find it)/general-letters/art lit
7 hrs
  -> thanks. No, it's not only used in legal docs. Also in litterary ones, and in many other fields. It's a quite old expression. The field should be changed, but there's not a specific field in which it is used.

agree  Luisa Fiorini
7 hrs
  -> grazie, Luisa

neutral  Alfredo Tutino: the accent is simply not correct, however: this is an archaic form of the article (plural, determinative) - see http://demauroparavia.it/63380 - not the adverb "lì" - see http://www.demauroparavia.it/63384
8 hrs
  -> Alfredo, if it means "qui" is correct, you agree with "lì". My answer is NOT "lì", but "not to be translated", which is correct. You are neutral about the question? :) :|

agree  Ivana UK
9 hrs
  -> grazie, Ivana

agree  potra: Yes, no translation
13 hrs
  -> thanks, Potra
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Sep 16, 2007 - Changes made by Emanuela Galdelli:
Field (write-in)not only used in legal field » also used in legal field
Sep 16, 2007 - Changes made by Linda 969:
FieldLaw/Patents » Art/Literary
Field (specific)Law (general) » General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Sep 16, 2007 - Changes made by Emanuela Galdelli:
Field (write-in)(none) » not only used in legal field
Sep 16, 2007 - Changes made by Emanuela Galdelli:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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