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signore a vita

English translation: tyrant, lord, despot

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:signore a vita
English translation:tyrant, lord, despot
Entered by: xlationhouse
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:44 Feb 14, 2007
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History
Italian term or phrase: signore a vita
For a tourist brochure, regarding the history of Arezzo:

L'ascesa di Guido Tarlati, della potente "casa" ghibellina dei Pietramala (nel 1312 vescovo, nel 1321 signore a vita), avvia nel Trecento un intenso sviluppo per Arezzo...

Is this correctly rendered as "Lord" (I would go ahead then and say, "Lord of Arezzo")?
xlationhouse
United States
Local time: 06:30
tyrant, lord, despot
Explanation:
I know it seems extreme, but ain cademic twentieth century medieval Italian historiography the "signori" of the 13th - 15th centuries are referred to as tyrants and despots, whether they are actually tyrannical or not.

However, "lord" is becoming more widely used because of the negative connotations with the word "tyrant", and 21st c. historiography seems to be moving in this direction.

In the introduction to a paper I wrote last year on the Scaglieri (the signori of Verona) and the della Torre (Milano) I elaborated on the three terms, if you want me to email it to you.

JK Hyde (Society and Politics in Medieval Italy) refers to them as lords, as does John Larner (The Lords of Romagna); while I believe PJ Jones refers to them as despots (Communes and despots: The city-state in late medieval Italy).

If I were you, considering the context I would put "lord". Don't leave it in Italian. The "a vita" part is superfluous and tautological, considering the context, so you can ignore it safely. Another example of Italian wordiness.








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Note added at 33 mins (2007-02-14 17:17:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, "...but in academic 20th c. historiography" etc.
Selected response from:

Katherine Zei
Canada
Local time: 08:30
Grading comment
Thank you, everyone!

I used Lord because it looks as though Katherine has done quite a bit of research on this, and also because most of the references I found used this term.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1tyrant, lord, despot
Katherine Zei
5Prince for lifeZypcio
4 +1lifelong ruler
Aida GarciaPons
4Master of the city for life
eride
4lifetime peerage
nedra
3ruler for life
Mary Stefan
3signore, if need be life long signore (but do not like it)
cjohnstone


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
signore, if need be life long signore (but do not like it)


Explanation:
Would not for anything turn signore into Lord... too odd in the context... sorry to be so blunt, but anything but Lord or else if you think fit landlord without any capital letter... but signore and anything appended in Italian would seem better... :) They are things we should not try and turn into the other language, hopeless, especially if historical therefore engraved in the tradition

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2007-02-14 16:58:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

in indirect response to my colleague who had the nice peerage idea, there again, far too Brit for a historical tourist text!!! LEAVE IT IN ITALIAN!!! :)

cjohnstone
France
Local time: 15:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Master of the city for life


Explanation:
have a look at this it should help you:
http://www.terraditoscana.com/default.aspx?lpg=visitare_prov...

eride
Local time: 15:30
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tyrant, lord, despot


Explanation:
I know it seems extreme, but ain cademic twentieth century medieval Italian historiography the "signori" of the 13th - 15th centuries are referred to as tyrants and despots, whether they are actually tyrannical or not.

However, "lord" is becoming more widely used because of the negative connotations with the word "tyrant", and 21st c. historiography seems to be moving in this direction.

In the introduction to a paper I wrote last year on the Scaglieri (the signori of Verona) and the della Torre (Milano) I elaborated on the three terms, if you want me to email it to you.

JK Hyde (Society and Politics in Medieval Italy) refers to them as lords, as does John Larner (The Lords of Romagna); while I believe PJ Jones refers to them as despots (Communes and despots: The city-state in late medieval Italy).

If I were you, considering the context I would put "lord". Don't leave it in Italian. The "a vita" part is superfluous and tautological, considering the context, so you can ignore it safely. Another example of Italian wordiness.








--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 33 mins (2007-02-14 17:17:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, "...but in academic 20th c. historiography" etc.

Katherine Zei
Canada
Local time: 08:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thank you, everyone!

I used Lord because it looks as though Katherine has done quite a bit of research on this, and also because most of the references I found used this term.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rosanna Palermo: Lord does it for me
7 hrs
  -> grazie
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lifelong ruler


Explanation:
He was proclaimed lifelong ruler of Arezzo in 1321.


Examle of Italian text: "Fu proclamato signore a vita di Ferrara nel 1264, signore di Modena nel 1288 e di Reggio nel 1289. Con la sua acclamazione si concludeva il periodo comunale a Ferrara e iniziava ufficialmente la Signoria." http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obizzo_II_d'Este

English Equivalent: "Obizzo II d'Este (c. 1247 - February 13, 1293) was lord of Ferrara and the March of Ancona.
It must be noted that he was a bastard (cfr. http://genealogy.euweb.cz/welf/welf8.html), the fruit of an illegitimate relation of his father, Rinaldo I d'Este, a son of margrave Azzo VII d'Este. He was legitimated in his first years, since Rinaldo needed a heir to continue the house.
In 1264 he was proclaimed lifelong ruler of Ferrara, seignior of Modena in 1288 and of Reggio in 1289. His rule marked the end of the communal period in Ferrara and the beginning of the seigniory, which lasted until the 17th century." from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obizzo_II_d'Este


Aida GarciaPons
United States
Local time: 05:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in CatalanCatalan, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Loretta Bertoli
13 hrs
  -> Thanks Loretta.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
ruler for life


Explanation:
You might like to take a look at: http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=61wNf7ZJhkcC&oi=f...
Another option is just to leave "Bishop and Lord of Arezzo". From what I've read so far he was "bishop" first and then he became "despot".
Hope it helps : ) .


Mary Stefan
United States
Local time: 09:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RomanianRomanian
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
lifetime peerage


Explanation:
"granted a lifetime peerage"

vs. a hereditary one that he could pass on to his heirs.

I think I'm reading this right.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2007-02-19 12:00:57 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Uh, sorry! I didn't pay close attention to the date or context. My answer is clearly not appropriate here.

nedra
United States
Local time: 06:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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42 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Prince for life


Explanation:
"Prince" in the sense of "ruler, governor"

Zypcio
Italy
Local time: 15:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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