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due grossi venti denari

English translation: 2 grossi 20 denari

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22:10 Mar 27, 2004
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History / coins
Italian term or phrase: due grossi venti denari
Roman coins
Moll
Local time: 19:50
English translation:2 grossi 20 denari
Explanation:
2 grossi 20 denari

AFAIK
Grosso was a silver coin in parts of Italy from late Moddle ages, the value would depend on the place of coinage

E.g.:
"The Genoa Lira was divisible into 2.5 Genovino, 20 Soldi, 60 Grossi, 240 Denari or 960 Quartero.[1 grosso =4 denari]
[Venice, two monetary systems]
The Ducat was equal to 6.2 Lire and was divisible into 24 Grossi or 288 Grossetti.
The Scudo was equal to 7 Lire, and was divisible into 280 Soldi, 560 Bezzi, or 3360 Denari
http://www.globalfindata.com/frameset.php3?location=/gh/142....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs 23 mins (2004-03-28 18:34:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

mIddle ages!
Selected response from:

Mario Marcolin
Sweden
Local time: 19:50
Grading comment
many thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
42 grossi 20 denari
Mario Marcolin
4denarius, denariihodierne


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
denarius, denarii


Explanation:
Just enter denarii, you will find many hits on Google. However, as the Roman Empire spanned across a thousand years and several continents, a wide variety of denarii, whose value was subject to change, seems to have been circulating at that time.

Ref: University of Saskatchewan, Museum of Antiquities

.... Modifications were made to the coinage before and after the Second Punic War (218-210 BC), and by the end of the second century the principle coin of the Republic was the silver denarius, which was equal to ten bronze asses. During the 140’s BC, the denarius came to equal sixteen asses. The denarius also came to exhibit some unique features such as the denarius serratus with its serrated edge. The reason for this type of coin is highly debated with some suggesting that the serrated edge proved the purity of the coin while others say this feature made it difficult for the coins to be clipped for their precious metal. There was also a silver quinarius (one-half the value of the denarius) and the silver sestertius (one-quarter the value of the denarius). In the latter period of the Republic, the bronze sestertius came to be the common denomination; prior to this time all amounts were recorded in asses. Gold coins were seldom issued and were not part of the regular coinage of the Republic. After the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BC the gold aureus was struck by and for various disputants.

The emperor Augustus did much to standardize the Roman monetary system. The gold aureus and quinarius were regularly minted; the silver denarius and quinarius were kept as the monetary standard; the sestertius, dupondius, and semis were minted in orichalcum, an alloy of copper and zinc (orichalcum became the standard alloy during the late Republic when the use of the original bronze alloy of copper and tin was dismissed); the as and the quadrans were issued in copper.

TABLE OF DENOMINATIONS
(from the reign of Augustus to Nero)
Gold Aureus = 25 denarii, 100 sestertii, 400 asses
Quinarius = 12 1/2 denarii, 50 sestertii, 200 asses
Silver Denarius = 4 sestertii, 16 asses
Quinarius = 2 sestertii, 8 asses
Orichalcum Sestertius = 2 dupondii, 4 asses, 16 quadrantes
Dupondius = 2 asses, 8 quadrantes
Copper As = 4 quadrantes


+
Roman Republic (c. 200 BC)
1 silver denarius (4.5 g) = 10 bronze asses

Roman Republic (c. 100 BC)
1 silver denarius (4.5 g) = 16 bronze asses




    Reference: http://www.usask.ca/antiquities/coins/roman_coins.html
    Reference: http://www.coins_portal.com/denarii.php
hodierne
France
Local time: 19:50
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you, denarri wasn't the problem. I am really interested in the phrase and the word grossi. Thanks for your help
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thank you, denarri wasn't the problem. I am really interested in the phrase and the word grossi. Thanks for your help

20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
2 grossi 20 denari


Explanation:
2 grossi 20 denari

AFAIK
Grosso was a silver coin in parts of Italy from late Moddle ages, the value would depend on the place of coinage

E.g.:
"The Genoa Lira was divisible into 2.5 Genovino, 20 Soldi, 60 Grossi, 240 Denari or 960 Quartero.[1 grosso =4 denari]
[Venice, two monetary systems]
The Ducat was equal to 6.2 Lire and was divisible into 24 Grossi or 288 Grossetti.
The Scudo was equal to 7 Lire, and was divisible into 280 Soldi, 560 Bezzi, or 3360 Denari
http://www.globalfindata.com/frameset.php3?location=/gh/142....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs 23 mins (2004-03-28 18:34:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

mIddle ages!

Mario Marcolin
Sweden
Local time: 19:50
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
many thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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