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grosso

English translation: grosso

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:grosso
English translation:grosso
Entered by: Science451
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14:35 Mar 28, 2004
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History / coins
Italian term or phrase: grosso
'un grosso di sei denari battuto in 1316'. The name of a small silver coin that probably should not be translated. I would be tempted to write 'a grosso of six denarii minted in 1316' - unless anyone has any other ideas??
Moll
Local time: 16:03
grosso
Explanation:
HTH

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Note added at 2004-03-28 15:09:40 (GMT)
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In the first half of the thirteenth century Italian cities north of Rome introduced new, larger, silver coins known on account of their greater size as **grossi** (big ones) by contrast with the pre-existing denarii, which were soon called piccoli (little ones). Although they were all of approximately the same size as each other, containing about two grams of fine silver, the early grossi were initially worth between four and twenty-six of the piccoli, depending on how little silver the local denaro contained. In the second half of the thirteenth century, larger silver coins were also introduced in Rome and southern Italy, in France (gros) and the Low Countries (groten), and in the fourteenth century in the Empire (groschen) and England (groats). Many of these later gros, for example the gros tournois in France, were twice as large as the early Italian grossi. As well as the generic name, grossi, many of these larger pieces also acquired local soubriquets. The grosso of Venice, for example, was also known as a matapan, that of Florence as a fiorino, and that of Naples and Provence as a gigliato or julhat. .....


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Note added at 2004-03-28 15:11:10 (GMT)
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www.scc.rutgers.edu/memdb/DatabasesSpecificFiles/ About/aboutspuf.asp - 101k
Selected response from:

Science451
Italy
Local time: 16:03
Grading comment
Grazie!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1grossoScience451
1gros see explanation belowhodierne


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
grosso


Explanation:
HTH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-28 15:09:40 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the first half of the thirteenth century Italian cities north of Rome introduced new, larger, silver coins known on account of their greater size as **grossi** (big ones) by contrast with the pre-existing denarii, which were soon called piccoli (little ones). Although they were all of approximately the same size as each other, containing about two grams of fine silver, the early grossi were initially worth between four and twenty-six of the piccoli, depending on how little silver the local denaro contained. In the second half of the thirteenth century, larger silver coins were also introduced in Rome and southern Italy, in France (gros) and the Low Countries (groten), and in the fourteenth century in the Empire (groschen) and England (groats). Many of these later gros, for example the gros tournois in France, were twice as large as the early Italian grossi. As well as the generic name, grossi, many of these larger pieces also acquired local soubriquets. The grosso of Venice, for example, was also known as a matapan, that of Florence as a fiorino, and that of Naples and Provence as a gigliato or julhat. .....


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Note added at 2004-03-28 15:11:10 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

www.scc.rutgers.edu/memdb/DatabasesSpecificFiles/ About/aboutspuf.asp - 101k


    Reference: http://www.google.it/search?q=cache:UNRoxYfgWDgJ:www.iccoin....
Science451
Italy
Local time: 16:03
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Grazie!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mario Marcolin: grosso indicates the kind of coin, the value then indicated in denari
16 hrs
  -> grazie
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
gros see explanation below


Explanation:
Hello again,
Sorry, you won't go far with my answers today, all I can tell you is that it is called gros in French, un gros à trois deniers, un gros d'argent/d'or, etc..... If someone else can pick it up.

hodierne
France
Local time: 16:03
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 8
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