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c.d. (not so-called)

English translation: doing business as, trading as, known as

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:c.d. (not so-called)
English translation:doing business as, trading as, known as
Entered by: sarahca
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

20:15 Jan 10, 2008
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
Italian term or phrase: c.d. (not so-called)
I'm sorry to bring this up again - I know the question has been asked several times before and that c.d. stands for cosidetto or in theory, "so-called". However, in the context of a contract, where the context is (c.d. XXX Company Name), I really don't think so-called is appropriate. Maybe I'm wrong and this is an accepted legal term, but to me it says nickname or not really as it professes to be.

What does anyone else usually use?
sarahca
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:08
(in this context) known as, or possibly "doing business as"
Explanation:
Cosiddetto doesn't always have the negative sense of "so-called" in English (i.e., professed or presumed). Don't forget that "detto", standing alone, just means "known as" or "called" or "named." I'm with Jim that more context would help, but as it stands, I'd say they're simply saying "thus known" or "thus named," in which case "known as" works okay. You MIGHT use doing business as, if you have some indication that one individual or group is involved in a business with a different name, but DBA has a specific context in English so I'd be sure of myself before using that.
Selected response from:

WendellR
Local time: 07:08
Grading comment
that's great - thanks very much to you and to everyone else too!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1(in this context) known as, or possibly "doing business as"WendellR
3supposed / purported
James (Jim) Davis
3refs onlyliz askew


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
refs only


Explanation:
so-called - doubtful or suspect; "these so-called experts are no help"
alleged, supposed
questionable - subject to question; "questionable motives"; "a questionable reputation"; "a fire of questionable origin"

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Note added at 32 mins (2008-01-10 20:48:47 GMT)
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1. Commonly called: “new buildings … in so-called modern style” (Graham Greene). 2. Incorrectly or falsely termed: My so-called friends were gossiping about me again.
USAGE NOTE: Quotation marks are not used to set off descriptions that follow expressions such as so-called and self-styled, which themselves relieve the writer of responsibility for the attribution: his so-called foolproof method (not “foolproof method”).

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Note added at 35 mins (2008-01-10 20:51:34 GMT)
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supposedly?



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Note added at 36 mins (2008-01-10 20:52:09 GMT)
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for the moment, known as: company name

?

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Note added at 36 mins (2008-01-10 20:52:43 GMT)
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Is the company going to change name at all??

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Note added at 37 mins (2008-01-10 20:53:08 GMT)
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Or

currently?

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-01-10 21:33:55 GMT)
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Well, in that case:

known as

liz askew
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: exactly! Nothing to do with what they are referring to in the contract! So what would you put? My mind's a blank!

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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
supposed / purported


Explanation:
Without more context it is difficult. It could be that in this case "so-called" may actually be the best translation.

James (Jim) Davis
Seychelles
Local time: 09:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1337
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
(in this context) known as, or possibly "doing business as"


Explanation:
Cosiddetto doesn't always have the negative sense of "so-called" in English (i.e., professed or presumed). Don't forget that "detto", standing alone, just means "known as" or "called" or "named." I'm with Jim that more context would help, but as it stands, I'd say they're simply saying "thus known" or "thus named," in which case "known as" works okay. You MIGHT use doing business as, if you have some indication that one individual or group is involved in a business with a different name, but DBA has a specific context in English so I'd be sure of myself before using that.

WendellR
Local time: 07:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
that's great - thanks very much to you and to everyone else too!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  potra: I like DBA, I think it is a good option
1 hr
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Changes made by editors
Jan 11, 2008 - Changes made by sarahca:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/642942">sarahca's</a> old entry - "c.d. (not so-called)" » "doing business as/known as"


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