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risoluzione

English translation: terminate

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:risoluzione
English translation:terminate
Entered by: Joanna M Case
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

09:49 Mar 30, 2008
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
Italian term or phrase: risoluzione
'XX avrà il diritto di risolvere il Contratto'

A number of options - rescind, annul, terminate. With my (English) lawyer's hat on, the first two have the 'as if never signed' effect but my research suggests that this is not the effect of risoluzione in Italian law. Terminate I am not convinced about. Cancel?
Joanna M Case
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:53
terminate
Explanation:
terminate is fine

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Note added at 11 mins (2008-03-30 10:01:42 GMT)
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for examples:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=terminate contract&btnG...
Even more specifically (I am assuming we are talking about when XXX can terminate the contract due to breach by the other party):
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q="termination for breach...
as you can see, the expression is widely used


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Note added at 1 hr (2008-03-30 11:43:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

that is exactly what seems intended. XXX has the right to terminate the contract because of some breach on the part of the other party. Is that not the case? If so, terminate is perfect. It is not important whether it is 'as if it has never existed'. whether you call it terminate or cancel, legally speaking the effect is the same - all effects of the contract cease
Selected response from:

simon tanner
Italy
Local time: 19:53
Grading comment
IMHO i believe there is a difference in (Eng) law between the contract being rescinded (as if never entered into) and terminated (doesn't continue) particularly re damages. Thanks for help.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4terminate
simon tanner
4termination, cancellation
Giovanni Pizzati
3cancel
Paul O'Brien


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
cancel


Explanation:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q="cancel the contract"&b...

to cancel a contract is another option (if i'm not mistaken).

Paul O'Brien
Italy
Local time: 19:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 260

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  simon tanner: Hi Paul. Maybe a bit less used, but definitely an option. Whichever is chosen, Joanna should include both options in the glossary
3 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
termination, cancellation


Explanation:
3 (dir.) dissolution; cancellation; resolution; rescission: la - di un contratto, the cancellation of a contract; - extragiudiziale di un contratto, extrajudicial avoidance; la - di una società, the dissolution of a company


Giovanni Pizzati
Italy
Local time: 19:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 119
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
terminate


Explanation:
terminate is fine

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2008-03-30 10:01:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

for examples:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=terminate contract&btnG...
Even more specifically (I am assuming we are talking about when XXX can terminate the contract due to breach by the other party):
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q="termination for breach...
as you can see, the expression is widely used


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-03-30 11:43:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

that is exactly what seems intended. XXX has the right to terminate the contract because of some breach on the part of the other party. Is that not the case? If so, terminate is perfect. It is not important whether it is 'as if it has never existed'. whether you call it terminate or cancel, legally speaking the effect is the same - all effects of the contract cease

simon tanner
Italy
Local time: 19:53
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 317
Grading comment
IMHO i believe there is a difference in (Eng) law between the contract being rescinded (as if never entered into) and terminated (doesn't continue) particularly re damages. Thanks for help.
Notes to answerer
Asker: terminate is indeed qidely used but means the contract term is say for one year but after 3 months someone ends it and it runs no more. I am not convinced that's what they intend here. Cancel to me has the connotation of 'as if never existed'. I think I shall have to plump for one and put a translator's note. Thanks.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria Rosa Fontana
0 min
  -> thanks Maria Rosa

agree  Gemma Monco Waters
1 hr
  -> thanks Gemma

agree  Debora Villa
1 hr
  -> thanks Debora

agree  James (Jim) Davis: Joanna, in the context which you give, a full EIGHT WORDS, this definitely seems the most appropriate: As much explanation as possible should be entered for the term. Consider including: type of document/situation, country and dialect, URLs, translat...
7 hrs
  -> thanks Jim
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