KudoZ home » Italian to English » Other

mortadella di filiera affettata

English translation: guaranteed origin/producer guaranteed product

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:prodotto di filiera
English translation:guaranteed origin/producer guaranteed product
Entered by: Cate
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:01 May 15, 2002
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Italian term or phrase: mortadella di filiera affettata
Schede di prodotto per un sito web. Alimentare. Filiera come produciotn line, industry, chain etc. mi è chiaro (ho anche consultato il glossario), ma nel titolo abbinato al prodotto vuole forse indicare qualcosa come controllato, più sicuro. Il sito parla della loro produzione di fileria controllata per garantire un prodotto di alta qualità al consumatore, etc...

Any ideas per filiera nel titolo?
Cate
Italy
Local time: 15:43
guaranteed origin
Explanation:
This expression in used of course to translate "origine garantita" especially in relation to wines, but if you do a Google search you will find that it is also used for countless other products (butter, cheese...). Since the mortadella in question (as far as I know) does not attract "doc" cerficates in the same way was wine, using the expression in this context would simply mean that the meat from which the mortadella is made can be tracked down to its producer.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-15 23:21:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I went to the supermarket after posting this and in the delicatessen cabinet I saw some produce with the \"farm assured\" mark on it. This is quite common in UK and from a legal standpoint it does not mean anything: it is not \"organic\", it is not \"GMO free\", it is not \"free range\", but it does convey the idea that the product is somehow better quality, more genuine than others. It is purely a marketing device, which seems to me to be the case for \"di filiera\" .
Selected response from:

Anna Beria
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:43
Grading comment
Thanks to all. I think this is exactly what the text means.

Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1sliced Italian mortadellagmel117608
4sliced guaranteed origin mortadellaogdc
3 +1guaranteed originAnna Beria


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
guaranteed origin


Explanation:
This expression in used of course to translate "origine garantita" especially in relation to wines, but if you do a Google search you will find that it is also used for countless other products (butter, cheese...). Since the mortadella in question (as far as I know) does not attract "doc" cerficates in the same way was wine, using the expression in this context would simply mean that the meat from which the mortadella is made can be tracked down to its producer.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-15 23:21:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I went to the supermarket after posting this and in the delicatessen cabinet I saw some produce with the \"farm assured\" mark on it. This is quite common in UK and from a legal standpoint it does not mean anything: it is not \"organic\", it is not \"GMO free\", it is not \"free range\", but it does convey the idea that the product is somehow better quality, more genuine than others. It is purely a marketing device, which seems to me to be the case for \"di filiera\" .

Anna Beria
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:43
PRO pts in pair: 156
Grading comment
Thanks to all. I think this is exactly what the text means.

Thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  asynge: perhaps "producer guaranteed" - I think this is the right direction to be looking - filiera is a bit of a buzzword and may therefore actually be meaningless
11 hrs
  -> My feeling, too.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
sliced guaranteed origin mortadella


Explanation:
I WOULD NOT TRANSLATE MORTADELLA, AFTER ALL NO ONE HAS EVER TRANSLATED SALAME

ogdc
Italy
Local time: 15:43
PRO pts in pair: 15
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sliced Italian mortadella


Explanation:
or: sliced original Italian mortadella

(this option is a bit too long)

Genuine origin is an expression not commonly used in the UK. It sounds odd.

With regards to one of the previous comments, I would like to add:

salame is written "salami" in English.
2- In the past mortadella has been translated. Usually referring to an inferior product. In the US mortadella was also called Bologna a term which, subsequently, was misspelled in balloni (I believe). Obviously the US local mortadella bear no resemblance to the original product.
Nowdays , the American expression "a lot of balloni" (perchè le mortadelle possono anche essere molto grosse) means "a lot of rubbish", "a lot of nonsense".
Anyway, according to the Picchi: Grande Dizionario IT <=> Ing, Hoepli, 2001:

mortadella
nf (alim) polony, polony sausage, Bologna sausage.

However,personally since the Italian food has now gained high status in the UK, I would not translate the word mortadella. The Beretta company sells its Mortadella in the Tesco supermakets, simply as " Sliced Mortadella"
Kind regards,
Giuseppe (Melecci)

gmel117608
Local time: 14:43
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 78

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Edward Potter: I might add that it is often spelled "baloney" when used in the colloquial context.
1288 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search