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panna di affioramento

English translation: cream (that has risen)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:panna di affioramento
English translation:cream (that has risen)
Entered by: Giles Watson
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18:24 Jul 15, 2002
Italian to English translations [PRO]
/ cheese/butter
Italian term or phrase: panna di affioramento
Cari voi,
'panne da affioramento' in una breve frase:
dalla zangolatura delle panne di affioramento si ottiene il burro...
Any clue?
Thanks
B.W.
Bilingualduo
Italy
Local time: 06:35
cream (that has risen)
Explanation:
The problem here is that the Italian expression "panna da affioramento" is rather tautologous: the laws of physics decree that cream *must* rise to the top of milk if it is left to stand.

When I was translating "Italian Cheese" for Slow Food Editore, I used the term "rising of the cream" (confirmed by EurodicAutom) or a synonymous expression to translate "affioramento" and "cream" on the one or two occasions when "panna da affioramento" turned up. It was always obvious from the context that the cream was removed by leaving the milk to stand and then skimming it off.

HTH

Giles
Selected response from:

Giles Watson
Italy
Local time: 06:35
Grading comment
Thanks to all and special thanks Giles for your detailed answer. Buon lavoro a tutti.
B.W.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1cream (that has risen)
Giles Watson
4cream that has floated to the topalitalia
4rising cream
Enza Longo
3top of the milkAnna Beria
4 -1buttermilkxxxjerryk


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
rising cream


Explanation:
I'm not sure this is the correct way to say it but it's the cream that rises to the top from which butter is made.
Ciao.

Enza Longo
Canada
Local time: 00:35
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 694
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
buttermilk


Explanation:
What is buttermilk? Does it really contain butter?
http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/20001009.html
More sites about: Ask Yahoo! Questions


xxxjerryk
PRO pts in pair: 76

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Giles Watson: "Buttermilk", or the liquid left in the churn when the butter has been extracted, is "latticello" in Italian.
59 mins
  -> True. I was looking for an actual english term corresponding to the Italian, but there doesn't seem to be one in regular use.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cream (that has risen)


Explanation:
The problem here is that the Italian expression "panna da affioramento" is rather tautologous: the laws of physics decree that cream *must* rise to the top of milk if it is left to stand.

When I was translating "Italian Cheese" for Slow Food Editore, I used the term "rising of the cream" (confirmed by EurodicAutom) or a synonymous expression to translate "affioramento" and "cream" on the one or two occasions when "panna da affioramento" turned up. It was always obvious from the context that the cream was removed by leaving the milk to stand and then skimming it off.

HTH

Giles

Giles Watson
Italy
Local time: 06:35
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1740
Grading comment
Thanks to all and special thanks Giles for your detailed answer. Buon lavoro a tutti.
B.W.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daniela McKeeby
6 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cream that has floated to the top


Explanation:
From the first website on how butter was made "back then": "You must first get the cream. You do this by letting the raw
whole milk sit for several hours. The cream will naturally float to the top. You can skim this off the top of the milk."
From the second website: "Until well into the 19th century, butter was still made from cream that had been allowed to sour naturally. The cream was then skimmed from the top of the milk and poured into a wooden tub. Butter was made by hand in churns. The natural souring process is very sensitive, and infection by foreign micro-organisms often spoiled the result. As knowledge of cooling increased, it became possible to skim the cream before it had gone sour and make butter from the sweet cream."


    Reference: http://www.kings-county.net/lessons/churning_butter.html
    Reference: http://www.rochsec.vic.edu.au/Pages/MGPages/butterprod.html
alitalia
United States
Local time: 00:35
PRO pts in pair: 38
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
top of the milk


Explanation:
In the days before homogenization, when milkmen still routinely delivered milk to virtually every doorstep in towns all over Britain, if you bought "full-cream milk", before being able to pour it out of the bottle, you had to remove the luscious "top of the milk", quite simply the cream that had risen to the top. But perhaps this is not a technical term?

Anna Beria
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:35
PRO pts in pair: 156
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