KudoZ home » Italian to English » Other

incapaci

English translation: persons needing supervision

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
09:54 Apr 4, 2003
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Italian term or phrase: incapaci
Hi folks,
I have a problem with translating the concept of "incapaci" in this context:
"Non lasciare le parti dell'imballo alla portata di bambini o incapaci"
The translator has written "the infirm" but I am slightly wary. Do you think "infirmity" encompasses the scope of the Italian? Any alternative PC ideas for this one?
TIA
Derek
Derek Smith
Local time: 02:47
English translation:persons needing supervision
Explanation:
it's a tricky one for PC reasons, as you imply! you can't use it in the sense of 'legally incompetent' or (even though this is probably what it means) mentally handicapped, and there is no reason why a person who is infirm or physically disabled shouldn't be capable of taking his own medicine.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-04-04 11:17:54 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

reading your question again, of course it refers to the pack or packaging, which usually has a warning notice about not letting children handle it, so it should even less have a warning for the disabled who, in general acceptance, are considered to be the physically handicapped.
Selected response from:

Lanna Castellano
Local time: 01:47
Grading comment
A deceptively difficult nut to crack. Although "disabled" was a popular solution (thanks Rod), I agree with AM123 about its potential for offending disabled folks. The disability referred to is, presumably, more of a "mental impairment" as Gmel proposed (thanks Giuseppe), though this sounds a bit strong for the context. In short, there were several valid suggestions here, and perhaps the validest is Lanna's excellent circumvention (thanks), though after hunting about on the net and racking my braincell I tend to agree with Grace (thanks) that the GB equivalent stops at children - perhaps there is some point of law wherein a mentally retarded person can be equated with a child in relation to potential for inflicting self-harm. This all said and done, I later discovered that the "infirm" solution (which was beginning to sound quite clever once I started looking at all the angles here) has already been accepted by the customer, so since it ain't specifically broke, I guess I won't have to specifically fixit.
Thanks to all and Maximum Appreciation
Derek
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +7disabled
Rod Nelson
3 +7persons needing supervision
Lanna Castellano
4 +2keep out of the reach of childrenGrace Anderson
5'incapacitated' or simply 'invalids'.
Atalanta Marchessini
5keep out of the reach of children and of the mentally impairedgmel117608
4the unskilledClorinda
3 -1incompetentsmanducci


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
disabled


Explanation:
Taken in the broadest sense, it covers the need here.

Rod Nelson
Canada
Local time: 17:47
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 175

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Giusi Pasi
11 mins

agree  Domenica Grangiotti
14 mins

agree  xxxLucchini: it well gives the idea of both mental and physical limitation of the italian term
19 mins

agree  laura rutigliano
29 mins

agree  Gian
47 mins

agree  paolamonaco
2 hrs

agree  Kimmy
3 hrs

neutral  manducci: It's too broad and includes the sane and is therefore offensive.
3 hrs
  -> See Ledia Kita's response below.

agree  Ledia Kita: I have translated many materials for the School District in US and the terms "disable or infirmity" are used very often
5 hrs

disagree  Atalanta Marchessini: Many disabled people would be very offended by the implication that they are unable to help themselves
8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
incompetents


Explanation:
Not the best, I admit but perhaps close in meaning.

manducci
Local time: 02:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 610

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Catherine Bolton: "Incapace" refers to people with disabilities. There are plenty of folks who are NOT disabled but are incompetents nonetheless.
1 hr
  -> I rejected disabled precisely because it's too broad and includes the physically impaired who are mentally sane and can be trusted not to harm themselves . I intended incompetents as those who can't be trusted."disabled" is offensive
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

56 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
persons needing supervision


Explanation:
it's a tricky one for PC reasons, as you imply! you can't use it in the sense of 'legally incompetent' or (even though this is probably what it means) mentally handicapped, and there is no reason why a person who is infirm or physically disabled shouldn't be capable of taking his own medicine.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-04-04 11:17:54 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

reading your question again, of course it refers to the pack or packaging, which usually has a warning notice about not letting children handle it, so it should even less have a warning for the disabled who, in general acceptance, are considered to be the physically handicapped.

Lanna Castellano
Local time: 01:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1083
Grading comment
A deceptively difficult nut to crack. Although "disabled" was a popular solution (thanks Rod), I agree with AM123 about its potential for offending disabled folks. The disability referred to is, presumably, more of a "mental impairment" as Gmel proposed (thanks Giuseppe), though this sounds a bit strong for the context. In short, there were several valid suggestions here, and perhaps the validest is Lanna's excellent circumvention (thanks), though after hunting about on the net and racking my braincell I tend to agree with Grace (thanks) that the GB equivalent stops at children - perhaps there is some point of law wherein a mentally retarded person can be equated with a child in relation to potential for inflicting self-harm. This all said and done, I later discovered that the "infirm" solution (which was beginning to sound quite clever once I started looking at all the angles here) has already been accepted by the customer, so since it ain't specifically broke, I guess I won't have to specifically fixit.
Thanks to all and Maximum Appreciation
Derek

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Grace Anderson
5 mins

agree  Sarah Ponting: this is a more delicate way of putting it
17 mins

agree  Alessandra Castellucci
29 mins

agree  Mirelluk
1 hr

agree  manducci: This is better than my "incompetents" and far less offensive than "disabled".
2 hrs

agree  virgotra
3 hrs

agree  Antonio Volpe Pasini
3 hrs

agree  kringle: much prefer this one to the other suggestions, sticky tho'
11 hrs

neutral  Vittorio Felaco: Sì, ma non funziona come avviso per i materiali indicati sopra.
12 hrs

disagree  Rod Nelson: inappropriate and out of context
19 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the unskilled


Explanation:
Just an idea... It could be the inexpert or the unpractised!
It is not offensive and it fits in this context, since incapaci means people who are not skilled in something

Clorinda
Italy
Local time: 02:47
PRO pts in pair: 11
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
'incapacitated' or simply 'invalids'.


Explanation:
I think that 'incapacitated' is more appropriate than disabled as it implies a temporary state - ie. those incapacitated through illness, persons temporarily unable to help themselves, either physically, or because of temporarily impaired judgement. Alternatively, you could just use 'invalids' which is more commonly used in this context than 'the infirm'', encompasses all of the above, and is not offensive.

Atalanta Marchessini
Local time: 01:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
keep out of the reach of children


Explanation:
I think you would be best to use the formula most used in English and forget the "incapaci" - I think it's implied. If you have to use anything else I would keep it to Lanna's description which seems the least offensive.

Grace Anderson
Italy
Local time: 02:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3429

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vittorio Felaco: A me sembra che questa sia la frase che meglio corrisponde alla domanda. Se vi fosse stato ulteriore contesto non vi sarebbero dubbi.
3 hrs

agree  manducci: yes, probably best to omit the phrase altogether
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
keep out of the reach of children and of the mentally impaired


Explanation:
Just an alternative.

Buon lavoro
Giuseppe (Melecci)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-04-05 00:26:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or :
keep out of the reach of children and of people/individual(s) with cognitive deficit(s)/impairment(s).

or:

keep out of the reach of children and of individuals with impairments

If you wish to be slighgtly more diplomatic or politically \"more correct\".

In Italian \"incapace\" is also used in a standard legal expression: \"incapace di intendere e volere\"...

Saluti
Giuseppe (Melecci)


gmel117608
Local time: 01:47
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 78
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search