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capocciare

English translation: to clash

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:capocciare (region.)- cozzare
English translation:to clash
Entered by: xxxsofiablu
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13:14 Nov 1, 2006
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Italian term or phrase: capocciare
this word appears in themtext "Baiadera" by Italian writer Rossana Ombres, written in 1997 - it's a romantic fiction
J
clash
Explanation:
"capocciare" is not Italian, it's Roman. In Italian we say "cozzare", i.e. "clash" in English.

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Note added at 2 hrs (2006-11-01 15:20:50 GMT)
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Hi J! You're welcome!
Selected response from:

missdutch
Netherlands
Local time: 04:33
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +6clash
missdutch
4collided with one another (oppure) colliding
clarinet3
3 -2hit oneself head
Mirra_


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
clash


Explanation:
"capocciare" is not Italian, it's Roman. In Italian we say "cozzare", i.e. "clash" in English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2006-11-01 15:20:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hi J! You're welcome!

missdutch
Netherlands
Local time: 04:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker:

Asker: thank you very much, thats really appreciated, thank you!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Mirra_: 'capoccia' (i.e. head) is Roman; 'scapocciare' (i.e. to get crazy) is Roman. But, here in Rome I NEVER heard 'capocciare', you really did??? R: SO,you did not! AND "doesn't really matter"??????!!! O____O
34 mins
  -> I know for sure it's not Italian; it sounds like Roman, anyway whether it is or not, doesn't really matter. I come from Turin and I've never heard that word in 30 years.

agree  Alfredo Tutino: She's a a learned writer who makes a personal and "creative" use of dialect - most Italians, I guess, would readily understand the phrase as an equivalent of "si prendevano a capocciate (in standard Italian: "testate") fra loro"
2 hrs
  -> thank you Alfredo for your learned comment and support!

agree  gianfranco
2 hrs
  -> thank you Gianfranco!

agree  Liliana Roman-Hamilton: I'd say "clash" too.
3 hrs
  -> thank you my flower!

agree  texjax DDS PhD
3 hrs
  -> thank you my treat!

agree  Giada Gelli
20 hrs
  -> thank you Giada!

agree  irenef: brava!
1 day6 mins
  -> thank you my beloved!
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -2
hit oneself head


Explanation:
a Torino, da dove viene la Ombres, significa questo

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Note added at 2 hrs (2006-11-01 15:37:54 GMT)
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and it clearly involves not just an indeterminate clash, but more precisely a hit given with the head... :)

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-11-01 18:14:17 GMT)
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AFTER reading the sentence, to better express the sound/movement effect -and eventually meaning - contained in the verb 'capocciare' I'd suggest to use 'beat against each other' :)

Mirra_
Italy
Local time: 04:33
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Ivana UK: "hit oneself head" means absolutely nothing in English. (I assume you mean: head-butt?). If so, "thoughts" cannot possibly head-butt themselves!!
1 hr
  -> really???????? perhaps you were confounded by the use of the term 'oneself'??? e.g. http://www.google.it/search?num=20&hs=zII&hl=en&client=firef...

neutral  gianfranco: (ungrammatical) and in this case, after reading the complete source sentence, is more clash than headbutting
2 hrs
  -> in my opinion,since we are dealing with a slang term (and slang term are known to yeld an immediate a realistic 'physical' perception of the word meaning),'to clash' doesn't suit well to the sound produced by a head.It's more likely to derive from a plate

disagree  Liliana Roman-Hamilton: hit oneself head is not correct. Did you mean "to hit one's head"? But still, shouldn't it involve a person hitting his/her head? Inanimate things don't have heads (see J's sentence)
3 hrs
  -> yes sorry I meant that. BUT, basically, please understand that 'capocciare' MEANS 'hit with the head'. That's it. Even if it is used, for figurative purposes, with the term 'cose'. That doesn't mean plainly 'thoughts'.
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1 day2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
collided with one another (oppure) colliding


Explanation:
....

clarinet3
Italy
Local time: 04:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in EnglishEnglish
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (3): xxxsofiablu, Mirra_, clarinet3


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Changes made by editors
Nov 2, 2006 - Changes made by clarinet3:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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