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L'e' nato furlan

English translation: He was born Friulian

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Italian term or phrase:L'e' nato furlan
English translation:He was born Friulian
Entered by: Olga Buongiorno
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

22:48 Jul 4, 2008
Italian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Italian term or phrase: L'e' nato furlan
Veneziano for "Lui e' nato furlano", I'm told, but I can't figure out what "furlano" is referring to. As far as I can tell, it is either a last name or a flirtatious 16th century Venetian dance with mandolins and castanets. Any suggestions?
Kristel Kiesel
United States
Local time: 15:41
He was born Friulian
Explanation:
Same link as the previous one:
http://www.turismovenezia.it/upload/12/images/PDF/RivistaDiV...
Selected response from:

Olga Buongiorno
Italy
Local time: 21:41
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6He was born Friulian
Olga Buongiorno
5 +4He was born "friulano"
Cristina intern
4 +4See answer
Giles Watson
5 +1he was born in Friuli
Mirra_
3 +1E' nato friulano
Serena Arduini


Discussion entries: 9





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
He was born Friulian


Explanation:
Same link as the previous one:
http://www.turismovenezia.it/upload/12/images/PDF/RivistaDiV...

Olga Buongiorno
Italy
Local time: 21:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Olga!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cristina intern: In English it is "Friulan", not "Friul'i'an", Derives from Ital. "friulano". Vedi mie note. Anche il sito > usa "friulan" in inglese.
4 mins
  -> Ciao Cristina. Non ho visto la tua nota perchè era successiva alla mia entry!

agree  rossella mainardis: si, qui in Friuli lo traduciamo Friulian!
8 hrs
  -> Grazie Rossella!

agree  manducci: Most definitely Friulian not Friulan - I've just translated a book on the language! Any search for Friuli's most famous writer, Pasolini, will confirm this.
11 hrs
  -> Grazie Manducci

agree  Valeria Lattanzi: In your link "like all Friulans"
11 hrs
  -> Grazie Valeria

agree  Sarah Jane Webb: Friulian, vedi anche Wikipedia www.lonweb.org/link-friulian.htm
12 hrs
  -> Grazie Sarah Jane

agree  Gina Ferlisi
16 hrs
  -> Grazie Gina

agree  languagelearner
2 days8 hrs
  -> Grazie Colette
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
He was born "friulano"


Explanation:
"Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region (Italy)-
The Friuli-Venezia Giulia region was created after the WWII incorporating the province of Udine ... Their language is the "Furlan", in italian "Friulano". ...
flagspot.net/flags/it-fri.html


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Note added at 6 mins (2008-07-04 22:55:08 GMT)
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Friulano
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
**Friulano** is also a name for the Friulian language.

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Note added at 15 mins (2008-07-04 23:03:26 GMT)
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He was born ***Friulan***

"It is estimated that in addition to the 600000 Friulans in Friuli there are another 1000000 people of Friulan origin outside of Friuli. ..."
www.geocities.com/athens/styx/9982/aboutour.htm

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Note added at 7 hrs (2008-07-05 06:09:52 GMT)
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"L'è nato FURLAN" = original dialect
He was born "FRIULANO" = Italian, in inverted commas
He was born FRIULAN = translated into English, oft used

In Poetry & Literature & Art I would say - He was born "Friulano" - (in inverted commas) to keep the colourfulness of the Italian language, which can be well understood. And may be write in a marginal note (in inverted commas) the colourful dialect expression - "L'e' nato furlan" -
... That is like writing "siciliano" (in inverted commas) or translating it into Sicilian... It does not really make sense in literature, does it?

Cristina intern
Austria
Local time: 21:41
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: The mandolins and castanets are out, then. Thanks! :) Can you tell me, is it preferable to say Friulan or Friulian?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Luisa Fiorini
7 hrs
  -> Grazie Luisa

agree  Maria Luisa Dell'Orto
7 hrs
  -> Grazie Maria Luisa

agree  Alessandro Zocchi: Eh... lo sapevo che veniva fuori... fortuna che in Veneto ostregheta non si dice quasi più almeno dalle mie parti :p
10 hrs
  -> Grazie Alessandro... "No a ghe se? Ostregheta!"

agree  ELISA GIUSTI: :-)
13 hrs
  -> Grazie Elisa
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
E' nato friulano


Explanation:
My father says furlan means friulano, which is, someone from Friuli-Venezia-Giulia. He seems very convinced of what he's saying, so I'm going to trust him. Hope this will help. =)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2008-07-04 22:57:43 GMT)
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Oh sorry. I was so concentrating in understanding the dialect that I forgot to answer. =D

It would be "He was born a Friulian".

Friulian is the name of the dialect:

http://www.reference.com/search?r=13&q=Friulian

So i guess it's also used for the inhabitants of the region?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2008-07-04 22:58:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Concentrated. Con-cen-tra-tED. =]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2008-07-04 23:00:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Concentrated on? Oh my god, that's it, I'm done with mistakes and trying to write anything in English for tonight.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 hrs (2008-07-05 13:21:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I just found this one: "Thus born ***a Friulian***"

http://www.oldandsold.com/articles27n/venice-academy-3.shtml

Someone in the English-speaking world agrees with me. Yay. =]

Serena Arduini
Ireland
Local time: 20:41
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cristina intern: Your father is right... "Furlan" means in Italian "friulano". I know the local dialects "friulano" and "veneto". But it should be translated with "friulan", not with "friul'i'an"
4 mins
  -> As they say, to each their own. I hopefully am entitled to suggesting my take on the term, i.e. "a friulian".

agree  luskie: you suggested "born A friulIan" at 9 min = 3 reasons to agree... e poi qualche pasticcino non fa mica male :)
9 hrs
  -> Grazie...ho fatto un pasticcio nel rispondere, ma la buona intenzione c'era. =]
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
he was born in Friuli


Language variant: (a/the) Friulian born /name/

Explanation:
The meaning -as the other peers already correctly stated- actually is 'born in Friuli' and so you can translate it.

http://www.google.it/search?num=30&hl=it&safe=off&q="born in...

and I think this is the correct way to translate it in English
anyway I guess that the second option is the most widespread way to say it if you prefer to be closer to the original text...
http://www.google.it/search?num=30&hl=it&safe=off&q="friulia...

Also, I do not think that any other way could communicate the musicality of the original sentence. As others suggest, better to put it in a separate note

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Note added at 14 hrs (2008-07-05 12:51:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ah...

my granny is Friulian! ;))

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Note added at 16 hrs (2008-07-05 15:03:32 GMT)
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for Giles:

please, don't refrain correcting me if it is the case
but
it seems to me that 'mean' has an evil connotation that lacks in 'stretto de man', hasnt'it? :)

Mirra_
Italy
Local time: 21:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Cristina intern: Well, I think it makes a small difference to say "He was born friulano" or "He was born in Friuli". Also some Chineses were born in Friuli, but they are not really "furlan", are they? Furthermore, this is Poetry & Literature... Italian "friulano"
30 mins
  -> your 1st proposal is not a translation your 2nd one doesn't sound 'English' at all... And Google finds NO hits for it http://www.google.it/search?num=30&hl=it&safe=off&q="born+Friulan"&meta=lr=lang_it

agree  Serena Arduini: Oh no, io sono emiliana e DISPETTOSA. =D *giggle*
47 mins
  -> :)) eheheh grazie! (ma pure tu sei un po' friulana? Mandi !! ;)) R. ahahhahah OK! :))
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
See answer


Explanation:
Hi Kristel,

I've been following - with no little amusement - the hornet's nest you seem to have stirred up with your Kudoz question ;-) Since I have lived in Udine for the past 25 years, I may have something to contribute so here goes.

First of all, Olga's document gives the whole of the rhyme, which it is probably better to translate as a unit:

El dose Manin dal cuore piccinìn
l’è stretto de man, l’è nato furlan”,

Shrunk is the heart of the Doge Manin
Like his homeland Friuli, his spirit is mean

You can probably improve on my version but the Venetian rhyme is humorous doggerel, not poetry!

Second, bear in mind that Friuli was Venice's boondocks. The Venetians very much appreciated Friulian wine but regarded the Friulians the way the English regarded the Scots (and the Scots the Aberdonians, at least until they found oil!).

Big city folk all over the globe have always despised country folk, envying their agricultural products while despising their apparently excessive thrift, generally the result of a chronic lack of ready cash. I'm sure everyone can think of "Friulians" (this is the spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary and Webster's) in their local context.

Actually, there is another Venetian jibe at Friulians:

Pansa tete e cul, xe la dote del Friul

which makes fun of the fact that Friulian brides brought no dowry with them.

Belly, bosom and bum - that's a Friulian dowry, chum!

Mandi,

Giles

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Note added at 16 hrs (2008-07-05 15:19:05 GMT)
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For Mirra:

It would be nice to use "tight-fisted", which is of course cognate to the Venetian "stret(t)o de man", but unfortunately it doesn't rhyme with "Manin" ;-)

"Mean" can, in some contexts, have a connotation similar to "meschino" but it doesn't always have that overtone and in any case it's certainly not as strong as "evil".

I'm sure Kristel will be able to find her own solution but she would be well advised to consider the rhyme as a whole and not phrase by phrase. In any case, no one seems to be arguing about the meaning of the two expressions she wants help with!

HTH

Giles


Giles Watson
Italy
Local time: 21:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 40
Notes to answerer
Asker: Giles, you gave me some great advice, and I did modify my translation to a more poetic form after reading your post. I come from a classical Latin background. You all helped me so much, I don't know who to pick!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Olga Buongiorno: Hi Giles this time I agree with Mirra!
13 mins

agree  luskie: great :)
20 mins

agree  Serena Arduini: You really have a talent for rhymes, and definitely get my vote for this term. Vote...term...oops, pun. =D
26 mins

neutral  Mirra_: 'mean' has nothing to do with 'tightfisted' .... Your translation is nice :) but , also, absolutely wrong! ... R: I answer to you in my space :)
46 mins
  -> "Mean" and "tight-fisted" are synonyms. Boerio's 1856 dictionary of Venetian confirms the translation but I am sure there are other possibilities, "absolute" or not ;-)

neutral  Cristina intern: Gilles, what you write is at the same time interesting and amusing... But please do not generalise about Friulans and Friulan women... In Trieste they are more "libertine" and "pleasure-loving". But in the North of Friuli they are or were very traditional
1 hr
  -> Please note that *you* are making generalisations about women. I quoted a Venetian saying to illustrate the relative economic status of a part of the Venetian Empire.

agree  Umberto Cassano
2 hrs

agree  languagelearner
1 day18 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Jul 18, 2008 - Changes made by Olga Buongiorno:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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