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帯石

English translation: molding

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:帯石
English translation:molding
Entered by: Mari Hodges
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01:51 Jul 22, 2005
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Architecture
Japanese term or phrase: 帯石
This is a type of stone in an arch. The sentences are:
写真1は,明治時代の標準的な坑門のデザインで、坑口を挟んで両側にピラスターがあり、帯石と笠石によって「城門」あるいは「冠木門」のようなスタイルに仕上げている。and
特に帯石や笠石には,煉瓦を互い違いにせり出させて,模様とした例がしばしば見られる。
Ihave also found it at http://senohatch.cocolog-nifty.com/top/cat2498094/ where it explains it as:
笠石・帯石:坑門上部,水平方向に詰まれた帯状の軒のような装飾の石のこと.最上部分を笠石,笠石とアーチの間のものを帯石という.
Arches have keystones (要石)and 笠石, which are capstones, but I don't know how to translate 帯石.
Any help is appreciated!
Mari Hodges
Local time: 14:05
hood molding
Explanation:
I've found a very intersting site (Glossary of Medieval Art and Architecture). According to it, "hood molding" is a projecting molding on the wall above an arch.
Selected response from:

Rie Fukuoka
Local time: 10:05
Grading comment
Thank you everyone for the help. I think that molding is correct. rfuku's reference led me to discover that obiishi is probably a type of molding, of which dentil molding is a common type.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4abutmentBJ Shore
3hood molding
Rie Fukuoka
1band / band-like structure with stonesKazumichi Sato
1Liner stone
Troy Fowler


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
帯石
Liner stone


Explanation:
I'm totally guessing, so be warned. I would render 帯石 as 'liner stone'. I found reference to 帯石 online (see link below).

I wonder if you can't identify the actual stones, then ask an English speaking mason how to say it.


    Reference: http://www.pref.shizuoka.jp/soumu/sm-13/amagisan/tonnel.htm
Troy Fowler
United States
Local time: 10:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
帯石
band / band-like structure with stones


Explanation:
Like as the previous anserer, Im not sure, so I propose my most likely guess. I picked up English words which are used on the same web page where a target English word corresponds to "帯石" would be written. My choise were capstone, parepet and pilaster. In spite of these related words, I could nt find target word with google and yahoo search. At last I gave up and try to be satisfied with "band", while in general architectual context "band"s are composed of molding material, not stones. So I appended "band-like structure with stones".

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Note added at 4 hrs 49 mins (2005-07-22 06:40:55 GMT)
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Typo. Parapet, not parepet.


    Reference: http://www.ontarioarchitecture.com/band.html
    Reference: http://nagajis.dyndns.org/KDC/structure/structure.html
Kazumichi Sato
Japan
Local time: 02:05
Native speaker of: Japanese
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
帯石
abutment


Explanation:
An abutment is on both sides of the arch and provides the brunt of the support for the arch. In the first web reference, it shows a bridge (about the fourth picture down) with the stones which are lying horizontally on either side. These would be the 帯石. You can see that these lie as an abutment (see second reference page).

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Note added at 16 hrs 0 min (2005-07-22 17:51:40 GMT)
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Of course, ¥"abutment¥" is a broader term and is not necessarily made of stones, so if you wanted to emphasize that, it could be translated as ¥"stone abutment¥" or ¥"abutment stones¥" collectively, or ¥"abutment stone¥" for identifying a single stone within the abutment.


    Reference: http://www.pref.shiga.jp/h/m-doboku/dobokuisan/osunagwa/osun...
    Reference: http://www.northome.k12.mn.us/studentprojects/bridges/arch.h...
BJ Shore
Local time: 19:05
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kazumichi Sato: You are mentioning about 迫台 or 迫石 ?
7 hrs
  -> Yes, you are right. For some reason I was under the impression that the obiishi lied on the sides of the arch rather than above it. This answer would probably not be appropriate. Thank you for pointing that out.
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1 day6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
帯石
hood molding


Explanation:
I've found a very intersting site (Glossary of Medieval Art and Architecture). According to it, "hood molding" is a projecting molding on the wall above an arch.


    Reference: http://www.pitt.edu/~medart/menuglossary/hoodmolding.htm
Rie Fukuoka
Local time: 10:05
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you everyone for the help. I think that molding is correct. rfuku's reference led me to discover that obiishi is probably a type of molding, of which dentil molding is a common type.
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