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よっこらしょ

English translation: Ooof!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:よっこらしょ
English translation:Ooof!
Entered by: eter2ty
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02:33 Mar 28, 2002
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Japanese term or phrase: よっこらしょ
Are there any expressions like this in English? The phrase is used when we sit down on a chair, stand up or lift something heavy.
eter2ty
Local time: 03:01
Ooof!, Here we go, Upsidaisy
Explanation:
I don't think there is an exact translation applies to this word. The three words I lited up can be used in different situations.

"Ooof" - when you sit down or stand up, or lift yourself up

"Here we go" - when you lift something heavy (more like 「せいの」「さぁ、いくぞ」)

"Upsidaisy" - when you take a child up in your arms, help a child to sit up

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-28 22:18:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

eter2ty-san: I¥'m not yet old enough , but I sometimes say ¥"yokkoisho¥". Anyway, ¥"Ooof¥" would be the closest one, as other pros are agreed, for the situations you described.
Selected response from:

RLinden
United States
Local time: 14:01
Grading comment
Many thanks, indeed! You gave me an opportunity to know other expression "Upsidaisy", I've never heard that before.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6Ooof!, Here we go, UpsidaisyRLinden
4 +2See explanation
Philip Soldini
4There we gonlavender


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
See explanation


Explanation:
I haven't heard this exact phrase before, but I live in the inaka. I'm assuming it's something like "yoisho" (however you spell it).

I can't think of anything that correlates with it in English. When an English speaker sits down, they might let out a sigh, or even say "Ahhh..." in an equivalent situation.

When lifting a heavy object, they might let out a breath then stop it halfway out as they tense up their muscles, making kind of a "Huっ" sound.

When my mother stands up (she's old with arthritis), she says "oo ouch oo ouch."

As for actual words, though, I don't think any exist.


Philip Soldini
Local time: 03:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxrya: I like your comment, since my mom also says like that. I'd probably say "Oh man!", "Oh boy!" You can pretty much say anything though. It's not quite as uniform as the Japanese yokkorasho.
19 hrs

agree  Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.): under a festival or joint-labor
5 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Ooof!, Here we go, Upsidaisy


Explanation:
I don't think there is an exact translation applies to this word. The three words I lited up can be used in different situations.

"Ooof" - when you sit down or stand up, or lift yourself up

"Here we go" - when you lift something heavy (more like 「せいの」「さぁ、いくぞ」)

"Upsidaisy" - when you take a child up in your arms, help a child to sit up

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-28 22:18:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

eter2ty-san: I¥'m not yet old enough , but I sometimes say ¥"yokkoisho¥". Anyway, ¥"Ooof¥" would be the closest one, as other pros are agreed, for the situations you described.


RLinden
United States
Local time: 14:01
Native speaker of: Japanese
PRO pts in pair: 10
Grading comment
Many thanks, indeed! You gave me an opportunity to know other expression "Upsidaisy", I've never heard that before.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LEXICON KK: no direct translations, but these are good substitutes!
2 hrs

agree  Mike Sekine: no equivalent for this one, as far as I know.
9 hrs

agree  tmmmrt
10 hrs

agree  Midori Wilson: Ooof would be close enough.
17 hrs

agree  shyboy75
1 day2 hrs

agree  plumeria: very good question (& answers!)...I wonder, then, how we should say "どっこいしょ" in English?? (^^)
1 day12 hrs
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2 days1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
There we go


Explanation:
Might I suggest 'there we go' as a natural sounding equivalent? Sometimes when older people talk to small children as they dress, feed, diaper, or buckle seat-belts, they might say when they have finished the task, 'there we go, now you're all set' or 'there you go, now you're all ready'. The phrase is kind of an interjection without much meaning, just an expression you might make after finishing a task that takes a little (or a lot) of effort. I can imagine someone leading a child or an elderly and weak person slowly up or down stairs, and stopping to encourage as they finish each step, 'there we go now, old chap!'For the case of an old woman, perhaps it is better to say something slightly different when sitting down or getting up. When sitting down something like 'oh my!there we go' or 'good heavens! there now, sittin' down' might do the trick. When getting up, something like 'alrighty, now up I go' or 'now then! let's get ourselves up' sounds appropriately elderly and old-fashioned, and expresses somewhat more articulately the grunts or little sighs of effort being made.


nlavender
United States
Local time: 14:01
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