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出ししみ

English translation: age spot

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:しみ
English translation:age spot
Entered by: Joe L
Options:
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04:21 Aug 11, 2006
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Cosmetics, Beauty
Japanese term or phrase: 出ししみ
**Please be aware that there is the possibility that this is not exactly the right word: I am dealing with a hard-to-read hand-written document, so I may not be reading some of the words right.**

This is a beauty diary, of how a woman takes care of her skin. She is describing how she washes her face, etc.

きめの細かいあわで洗いしっとり洗いあがる。
20分位バッティング(パッティング?)が理想 しっとりします
くすみ…出ししみが消えてきてます
かさっきをおさえて水分がにげなくなります。
美容液
乳液
クリーム

What is 出ししみ?

Thanks.
conejo
United States
Local time: 10:45
age spot
Explanation:
しみ is age spot,
however,
出し is probably connected to the preceding verbage, not しみ。
Please include the preceding words just to be sure.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2006-08-11 21:30:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The suppostion, raised by a peer, that we’re talking about
“blemishes”, not “age spots”, is a valid one to consider. But I
believe age spots remains the correct translation. Though the selected Japanese passage we are working with is brief, I believe we have enough context to compare it, show similarities with other Japanese text (which I’ll reference further below), and safely conclude that we are talking about “age spots”.

But before that, “age spots”, though of course more prevalent in older people than younger ones, is THE TERM use to describe a condition. As I mentioned elsewhere, I, myself, started getting age spots on the back of my hand at age 30. The modifier “age” does not restrict usage to the term to “the aged” anymore than the modifier “widow” restricts “widow’s peaks” to widows.

Now, ultimately I will defer to all my friends of the fairer sex on the following, but it does seem to me that “blemishes”, though
not necessarily, are usually the bane of younger people and are often(though, again, not always) associated with acne.
If you were to ask someone, “Quick! What’s a blemish?” I
think their initial reaction would affirm my point. Conversely,
when one sees an age spot on one’s cheek, forearm, or wherever, one thinks, “Oh-oh! I have an age-spot!” not “blemish”.

So which is it? Blemishes or age spots. Well, when speaking in Japanese, though I’m not a native speaker, I feel pretty confident that しみ most commonly is referring to what we
native English speakers call “age spots”. Here’s a few lines
from a Japanese website:

実年齢と肌年齢は、同じとはかぎりません。お肌がもともと持っている 「建やかになろうとする力」を高めて実年齢より若いお肌を目安しましょう。

The message, combined with the images of a youngish housewife, I believe, say it all. And then the clickable button
with “しみ・くすみの原因" use the exact same terms from
our asker’s, Conejo’s, passage.
Here’s the URL: http://www.saishunkan.co.jp/domo/sign/

I humbly rest my case.
Selected response from:

Joe L
United States
Local time: 09:45
Grading comment
Thanks everyone!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2age spot
Joe L
4 -1blemish, dark spots
humbird


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
blemish, dark spots


Explanation:
I think they are trying to appeal women (and some effeminated men -- or to avoid hurting someone's feeling -- appearance-sensitive men) who wish their facial skin problem to disappear. Of course it may be wrong to limit their concerns to just facial area, as other parts of the body could get such problem just as well.

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Joe L: "blemish, dark spots" is not a valid translation. It's either one term or the other. Not both at once.
4 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
age spot


Explanation:
しみ is age spot,
however,
出し is probably connected to the preceding verbage, not しみ。
Please include the preceding words just to be sure.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2006-08-11 21:30:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The suppostion, raised by a peer, that we’re talking about
“blemishes”, not “age spots”, is a valid one to consider. But I
believe age spots remains the correct translation. Though the selected Japanese passage we are working with is brief, I believe we have enough context to compare it, show similarities with other Japanese text (which I’ll reference further below), and safely conclude that we are talking about “age spots”.

But before that, “age spots”, though of course more prevalent in older people than younger ones, is THE TERM use to describe a condition. As I mentioned elsewhere, I, myself, started getting age spots on the back of my hand at age 30. The modifier “age” does not restrict usage to the term to “the aged” anymore than the modifier “widow” restricts “widow’s peaks” to widows.

Now, ultimately I will defer to all my friends of the fairer sex on the following, but it does seem to me that “blemishes”, though
not necessarily, are usually the bane of younger people and are often(though, again, not always) associated with acne.
If you were to ask someone, “Quick! What’s a blemish?” I
think their initial reaction would affirm my point. Conversely,
when one sees an age spot on one’s cheek, forearm, or wherever, one thinks, “Oh-oh! I have an age-spot!” not “blemish”.

So which is it? Blemishes or age spots. Well, when speaking in Japanese, though I’m not a native speaker, I feel pretty confident that しみ most commonly is referring to what we
native English speakers call “age spots”. Here’s a few lines
from a Japanese website:

実年齢と肌年齢は、同じとはかぎりません。お肌がもともと持っている 「建やかになろうとする力」を高めて実年齢より若いお肌を目安しましょう。

The message, combined with the images of a youngish housewife, I believe, say it all. And then the clickable button
with “しみ・くすみの原因" use the exact same terms from
our asker’s, Conejo’s, passage.
Here’s the URL: http://www.saishunkan.co.jp/domo/sign/

I humbly rest my case.


Joe L
United States
Local time: 09:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thanks everyone!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ala Rabie: true; 「くすみ出してしみが消えてきてます」になろうかと存じます。
19 mins
  -> Much obliged.

agree  Kurt Hammond
54 mins
  -> Much obliged.

neutral  humbird: Age spot commonly referred to skin problem (spot) of older woman. Unless this product is specifically marketed to this age bracket, this is a doubtful translation because young women also get しみ.
12 hrs
  -> Apparently you don't know that the English term "age spot" is the word for this, regardless of the actaul age of the person. I, myself, started noticing age spots on my hands by the time I was thirty.
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