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単位

English translation: credits (university)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:単位
English translation:credits (university)
Entered by: Joyce A
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04:59 Mar 11, 2007
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy
Japanese term or phrase: 単位
I am wondering what is the best way to translate this... In the US, I am familiar with saying 'credit hours' (you must have 30 credit hours in the department you are majoring in to graduate, etc.). And this credit hour system is based on the actual number of hours you spend in class. (If it is a 3 credit hour class, you spend 3 hours in class a week.)

However, at Japanese universities, I am not sure if I am safe saying "credit hours" because I don't know how their system works... Most of the classes in this list I'm looking at are 2単位, graduate-level courses.

I would like to say 'credit hours' but am wondering if it is safe to say this or not. (It sounds kind of lame to me to say 'units', so I want to say something better if there is a better translation)

Thanks.
conejo
United States
Local time: 00:46
credits (one credit, 2 credits, etc. in the university)
Explanation:
Conejo, I've always called "単位" just plain "credits" but I went through the U.S. educational system.

The Shogakukan Dictionary also defines it as "a credit." But it also says that they're "units" in England.

So, I believe that Ishigami-san's "unit" is also correct.

Maybe it boils down to choosing between an American style or a British style of translation. Anyhow, that's my thinking on this. :-)




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 41 mins (2007-03-11 05:40:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would venture to guess that each of those graduate level courses that you mention is worth/yields 2 credits much in the same way that courses are worth a certain amount of credits in the U.S.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-11 07:43:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oopsie, pardon my grammar error. "...courses that you mention "are" worth/yield 2 credits, much in the same way... :-)
Selected response from:

Joyce A
Thailand
Local time: 12:46
Grading comment
Thanks everybody.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +7credits (one credit, 2 credits, etc. in the university)
Joyce A
1 +7unitishigami


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +7
unit


Explanation:
http://www.twin.ne.jp/~aplac/ryu/ryuhsc.html

ishigami
Local time: 13:46
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joe L: Even in the U.S., some universities (like the one I went to) use the term "unit".
1 hr

agree  KathyT
1 hr

agree  compJPN
2 hrs

agree  Roger Johnson
3 hrs

agree  alexfromsd
8 hrs

agree  Nozomi Kugita
9 hrs

agree  Will Matter: Also completely acceptable. 2 units per semester / 2 credits per semester are both fine.
13 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
credits (one credit, 2 credits, etc. in the university)


Explanation:
Conejo, I've always called "単位" just plain "credits" but I went through the U.S. educational system.

The Shogakukan Dictionary also defines it as "a credit." But it also says that they're "units" in England.

So, I believe that Ishigami-san's "unit" is also correct.

Maybe it boils down to choosing between an American style or a British style of translation. Anyhow, that's my thinking on this. :-)




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 41 mins (2007-03-11 05:40:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would venture to guess that each of those graduate level courses that you mention is worth/yields 2 credits much in the same way that courses are worth a certain amount of credits in the U.S.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-03-11 07:43:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oopsie, pardon my grammar error. "...courses that you mention "are" worth/yield 2 credits, much in the same way... :-)

Joyce A
Thailand
Local time: 12:46
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 25
Grading comment
Thanks everybody.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tokyo_Moscow
9 mins
  -> Thank you, Tokyo_Moscow!

agree  Joe L
47 mins
  -> Thank you, Joe!

agree  KathyT
49 mins
  -> Thank you, Kathy!

agree  V N Ganesh
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Ganesh! It's a happy day for me, I see. :-)

agree  Harvey Beasley
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Harvey! It's my lucky day. :-)

agree  Nozomi Kugita
9 hrs
  -> Thank you, Nozomi!

agree  Will Matter
13 hrs
  -> Thank you, willmatter!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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