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see links below to pictures of package of Kombu Tea

English translation: It says...

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00:00 Oct 27, 2006
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Food & Drink / explanation of package instructions
Japanese term or phrase: see links below to pictures of package of Kombu Tea
I live in Okinawa. I got this at a 100 yen store. I did some research on Konbu Tea (more frequently called Kombu Tea), and whats in this doesn't seem like its what the internet says Kombu Tea is. The stuff in the package taste absolutely horrid, and it doesn't really fully dilute when mixed with water (hot or cold). Are there directions on the back? From what I read about Kombu Tea, its supposed to at least taste decent. Thanks!

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m131/meatbag01/konbu cha/...

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m131/meatbag01/konbu cha/...
Sean
English translation:It says...
Explanation:
Hi Sean,

"Kombu (Konbu) Tea" may indeed be an aquired taste.
You know that kombu is kelp (seaweed), right?

The directions say to put 1 stick of the powder in a small Japanese tea-style cup (the little ones with no handles like coffee cups), and then to add 100c.c. of slightly-cooled boiled water.

Enjoy!! :-)
Selected response from:

KathyT
Australia
Local time: 01:14
Grading comment
thanks thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3It says...
KathyT
5It is a gradule form of combu tea
humbird


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
It says...


Explanation:
Hi Sean,

"Kombu (Konbu) Tea" may indeed be an aquired taste.
You know that kombu is kelp (seaweed), right?

The directions say to put 1 stick of the powder in a small Japanese tea-style cup (the little ones with no handles like coffee cups), and then to add 100c.c. of slightly-cooled boiled water.

Enjoy!! :-)

KathyT
Australia
Local time: 01:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
thanks thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SLMorales: How funny! I totally agree with KathyT about the "acquired taste..." I'm curious what you read (and believed^-^) that made you think it would taste great!
4 hrs
  -> Hi Shannon, the Asker contacted me by private email and it seems he had thought it would be a mushroom tea....(not sure whether that means his reaction would have been any different, tho'!) Thanks :-)

agree  Bart B. Van Bockstaele: There several different types of these teas: konbu, ume, sakura, mushrooms... I no longer buy them because of their high sugar content, but I absolutely love them. It was "love at first taste" for me.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, BBVB :-)

agree  Joe L: I think the fact that this was 100 yen store stock means it probably flopped with with Japanese consumers, too. (#;#) ......my nauseated face...
17 hrs
  -> haha, thanks Joe ;-)
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
It is a gradule form of combu tea


Explanation:
I'm just curious what attracted you to combu-tea.
First off, this particular type of combu-tea is in granulated form with whatever method they applied to make it that way.
Combu is sea kelp and a good source of Japanese style soup stock. For this reason you can well assume that should taste good.
Nonetheless, in different avenue of thing, for a person such as myself it is absolutely horrible to see American put pretty good dose of sugar in the cup of my beloved green tea. This is a type of feeling some call "culture shock", and your first encounter with combu-tea may well could fall into this category of experience.

Well, combu or any type of seaweed is an alkaline food source which is absolutely good for us (as most foods we consume are acidic). But like for a child who hates vegetables, parent's "good for you" persuation does not work. So I would not recommend you would try this kind of cheap stuff in order to appreciate it fully. It is combu-tea version of teabag, but worse (even for the price).

You might find canned, powdered form more acceptable.
Don't give up on it. Someday you would find it absolutely stunningly exotic and wonderful in taste!

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
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