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猪突猛进

English translation: rush headlong into

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:猪突猛进
English translation:rush headlong into
Entered by: Harvey Beasley
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07:12 Mar 17, 2007
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Japanese term or phrase: 猪突猛进
贺年词 - 猪突猛进

I know these are Chinese characters, but since this is a Japanese greeting, I hope I can find some help here. I know "猪" refers to wild boars. Is there a standard English phrase used among the Japanese for this greeting?
Denyce Seow
Singapore
Local time: 16:57
rush headlong into
Explanation:
This is 猪突猛進 (ちょとつもうしん) in Japanese.

Because this year is the year of the boar, it has become kind of a catch phrase!

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Note added at 7 mins (2007-03-17 07:20:06 GMT)
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Oh, but your question, "Is there a standard English phrase used among the Japanese for this greeting?"... I have never heard a Japanese person refer to this in English.

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Note added at 17 mins (2007-03-17 07:30:05 GMT)
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Well, it's not a "greeting" per say, just an expression really. The reason that the Japanese, and I assume the Chinese use the "boar" analogy, is that they associate the boar with that straight line, head down, mad dash boars tend to do when they become aggressive. Most native English speakers wouldn't be able to make that connection...

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Note added at 40 mins (2007-03-17 07:53:11 GMT)
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I'm afraid I can't be much more help on this topic... Maybe someone else will be able to give you a hand. Sounds like a tough one. Good luck!
Selected response from:

Harvey Beasley
Local time: 17:57
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2rush headlong intoHarvey Beasley
5single heartedness
humbird
4 +1dash forward to your goal/target
Nozomi Kugita
2rush recklessly to one's goal without thinkingV N Ganesh
1 -1Unfinished tasks should be completed rather than starting new endeavors.
casey


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
rush headlong into


Explanation:
This is 猪突猛進 (ちょとつもうしん) in Japanese.

Because this year is the year of the boar, it has become kind of a catch phrase!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2007-03-17 07:20:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, but your question, "Is there a standard English phrase used among the Japanese for this greeting?"... I have never heard a Japanese person refer to this in English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2007-03-17 07:30:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, it's not a "greeting" per say, just an expression really. The reason that the Japanese, and I assume the Chinese use the "boar" analogy, is that they associate the boar with that straight line, head down, mad dash boars tend to do when they become aggressive. Most native English speakers wouldn't be able to make that connection...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 mins (2007-03-17 07:53:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I'm afraid I can't be much more help on this topic... Maybe someone else will be able to give you a hand. Sounds like a tough one. Good luck!

Harvey Beasley
Local time: 17:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: So there is no need to bring out "猪" (wild boars) in the English greeting?

Asker: I see. The problem is, my text describes both "猪突猛进" and "猪突猛伸" as New Year's greetings. The story is about some wild boars creating a havoc and hurting people on the first day of the pig's year. Somehow, the text goes on to mention these greetings.

Asker: Thanks anyway, Harvey.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KathyT: "rushing" is more likely to be associated with "a mad bull" or "a bull at a gate," but then you lose the 猪 inference.
47 mins

agree  Duncan Adam: Yes, it's just a phrase. Kathy's 'mad bull' catches the sense of it, I think. It doesn't have anything to do with greetings - I don't see what the asker means by that.
6 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Unfinished tasks should be completed rather than starting new endeavors.


Explanation:
http://www.luckyno3.jp/?cat=3

According to the website above, the phrase means "don't act like a pig/boar," i.e. don't rush headlong into something. Not sure how reliable the source is, since it is a blog.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2007-03-17 11:31:38 GMT)
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The English translation on that site is somewhat different from what is written in Japanese. Literally, of course, it means to "rush headlong into something" as Harvey stated, but apparently the idiom is used to stress what not to do. "猪突猛進ではダメということ" is what this person says it means, which could be translated as "don't 猪突猛進. "

casey
United States
Local time: 04:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 55

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  humbird: I don't see any relevancy in your translation and the quote to the question.
1 day19 hrs
  -> Not my translation. ;) Check the link. It's a native Japanese speaker.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
rush recklessly to one's goal without thinking


Explanation:
Chototsu-moushin (猪突猛進)" is one of the Yoji-jukugo which means "to rush recklessly to one's goal without thinking (like a wild boar runs)." ...
japanese.about.com/library/weekly/aa010307a.htm - 27k

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Note added at 4 hrs (2007-03-17 11:34:45 GMT)
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To move forward without fear

KudoZ) English to Japanese translation of to move forward without fear: ˖Ґi . ... Japanese translation:, 猪突猛進する. Entered by:, jsl ...
www.proz.com/kudoz/302218 - 31k -

V N Ganesh
Local time: 14:27
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Notes to answerer
Asker: In my context, "猪突猛進" is a New Year's greeting. It is supposed to have a good connotation.

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1 day14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
dash forward to your goal/target


Explanation:
猪突猛進 means exactly what Harvey, casey, and V N Ganesh have explained. This phrase can be used in a negative or a positive way.

In this particular context, as in this year's greeting, it is used in positive way, to imply that this is your year to accomplish somthing you have always wanted to do; that you need to start running toward your goal/target (just like those wild boars) without looking around, without making any more excuses.


Nozomi Kugita
United States
Local time: 04:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  KathyT: Yes, this is probably the most positive way to express it (so far!)
1 hr
  -> Thanks :)
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1 day23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
single heartedness


Explanation:
I see this term definitively positively, thus this suggestion.

The expression (single heartedness) is defined as:
characterized by sincerity and unity of purpose or dedication
(source: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/single heartedly).
Because 猪突猛进 is a noun, so is my answer. You would improvise it any form you fit.

Yes Boar is believed to go straight (even single-mindedly) after its intended purposes. While it is not a "greeting word" per se, it is a wonderfull expressopm in praise of alleged character attribution of this animal for the Year of the Boar new year greeting.

If you see this supposed character of the animal as single-mindeness, it is a derogatory (?) remark and he would be very ticked off. But again I do not think he should be, and your context supports that.
By the way I heard that in China "Year of the Boar" is called "Year of the Pig". Is that correct?


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Note added at 1 day23 hrs (2007-03-19 06:41:13 GMT)
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Typo: expressopm is meant for "expression" of courese.

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Note added at 1 day23 hrs (2007-03-19 06:49:31 GMT)
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For you question to Harvery "So there is no need to bring out "猪" (wild boars) in the English greeting?"
My answer ----- No. But you can add some explanatory remarks indicating we are talking about "猪".

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
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