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自己負担額

English translation: out of pocket expenses

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:自己負担額
English translation:out of pocket expenses
Entered by: Joss Ky
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12:35 Feb 19, 2008
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Insurance / Medical insurance (National Health Insurance)
Japanese term or phrase: 自己負担額
Source: 一般的に治療等に必要な医療費は医療保険が適応されますが、自己負担額が高額になった場合は...一定の基準額を超える部分が保険から給付されます。

This is about the National Health Insurance in Japan. Since I have no knowledge in this field, my guess is based on my research on the Internet. I am wondering whether the 自己負担額 means "co-payments" (the actual fees paid at the doctor's office) or "out-of-pocket expenses."
I would appreciate if someone could help.
Joss Ky
Australia
Local time: 08:45
Out of Pocket Expenses
Explanation:
I worked for a major insurance/health company for 3 years after university and I can tell you that the wording regarding these terms can be very important. "Copayment" is a very specific term which I would avoid by using the more general "out of pocket" here because you are talking about something in a system different than that which is native to you. "Copayment" might be what your client is looking for, but to be safe, it is better (in this case) to give a translation that is more general so that it could be interpreted a little more loosely and would be more likely to be understood on a wider range. Of course, this is just my opinion. Good luck!!!

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-02-19 13:57:47 GMT)
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Sorry, I forgot to tell you that if you're talking about the U.S., there is "copayment" which is a flat fee, and "coinsurance" which is a percentage of the fee paid to a doctor or pharmacist. Both are considered type of payment which are made "out of pocket" and that's why I think you can't go wrong with "out of pocket" here.
Selected response from:

Ruth Sato
United States
Local time: 18:15
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4Out of Pocket Expenses
Ruth Sato
4 +1copayment
Jean-Christophe Helary
4copayment
cinefil
3patient's payment/charge
valhalla55


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
copayment


Explanation:
Copayment
If you receive medical treatment at a hospital, you are required to pay 10% of the medical expenses. However, persons with an above average income are required to pay 20%.
http://www.city.fukuoka.jp/kokuho/english/area1/main/e1_13.h...

cinefil
Japan
Local time: 07:15
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in category: 48
Notes to answerer
Asker: thank you very much!!

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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Out of Pocket Expenses


Explanation:
I worked for a major insurance/health company for 3 years after university and I can tell you that the wording regarding these terms can be very important. "Copayment" is a very specific term which I would avoid by using the more general "out of pocket" here because you are talking about something in a system different than that which is native to you. "Copayment" might be what your client is looking for, but to be safe, it is better (in this case) to give a translation that is more general so that it could be interpreted a little more loosely and would be more likely to be understood on a wider range. Of course, this is just my opinion. Good luck!!!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-02-19 13:57:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, I forgot to tell you that if you're talking about the U.S., there is "copayment" which is a flat fee, and "coinsurance" which is a percentage of the fee paid to a doctor or pharmacist. Both are considered type of payment which are made "out of pocket" and that's why I think you can't go wrong with "out of pocket" here.

Ruth Sato
United States
Local time: 18:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you!! I think I am starting to understand a little better.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kurt Hammond
30 mins

agree  Can Altinbay: Absolutely this one. Copayment is too limited.
1 hr

agree  Shawn Morse
3 hrs

agree  xxxvwkl: out-of-pocket expenses: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Out-of-pocket_expenses
12 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
patient's payment/charge


Explanation:
just another suggestion

valhalla55
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Notes to answerer
Asker: hmm..maybe that's another way out. thank you!

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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
copayment


Explanation:
The 自己負担 part is what is not covered by the National Insurance Plan. (国民保険). I know, that is what I pay when I go to the doctor...

But you have to understand that the amount is not reimbursable. It is the minimum amount of money you have to pay. It can be more. Like for births, 自己負担 is 100%.

"1 The National Health Insurance covers 70% of the total cost of medical treatment.
Patients are required to pay 30% of the expenses to medical institutions
upon receiving treatments (show your Health Insurance Card before
receiving the treatment)."

http://www.city.urayasu.chiba.jp/foreign/chinese/pdf/proced....



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Note added at 1 hr (2008-02-19 14:26:33 GMT)
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In other words, both copayment and "out of the pocket expenses" are true here. Because that is the way the system works. But in some specific cases, like births (and we've had three here...) you can get 100% of the money back but not from NIP but from your city's welfare department etc. In such cases you can't say it is "out of the pocket expenses" since you'll get the money back from another channel.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-02-19 14:28:24 GMT)
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To Ruth: in France we have "tiers-payant" and "ticket modérateur", which seems to cover what you refer to in your note.

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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-02-19 14:35:48 GMT)
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http://www.ipss.go.jp/webj-ad/WebJournal.files/SocialSecurit...

This document explicitly uses copayment to refer to the 30% 自己負担額 but this one puts it the other way round, by talking of a 70% "benefit rate". While using the term copayment in a slightly different context.
http://www.mof.go.jp/english/budget/brief/2002/2002-10.htm




Jean-Christophe Helary
Japan
Local time: 07:15
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
Notes to answerer
Asker: wow, thank you! I will have to think carefully...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Manish Vadehra
1 hr
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