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台車

English translation: undercarriage

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:台車
English translation:undercarriage
Entered by: Anchoy
Options:
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00:55 Mar 3, 2004
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Mechanics / Mech Engineering / Passenger Train Mechanics
Japanese term or phrase: 台車
This refers to the heavy, sturdy lower structure of a modern passenger train to which the wheels are attached. I've come up with "bogie" and "undercarriage." What would be the proper English translation for this?

新形式鉄道用ガイドウェイと台車構造について、3年間にわたって研究が行われた。
Anchoy
United States
Local time: 12:50
undercarriage
Explanation:
You didn't mention the intended audience. Stockholders and other general readerships are likely to not know this sense of "bogie" and to misinterpret "truck."

Context is everything.

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Note added at 2004-03-03 02:48:39 (GMT)
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Snowbee raises another point: Using too technical a term risks running into UK/US variations.

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Note added at 2004-03-03 02:52:51 (GMT)
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Undercarriage also includes the frame connecting the truck to the superstructure, driving linkages, etc. Does the rest of the document cover that or concentrate just on the wheels staying on the track/guideway?

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Note added at 2004-03-03 02:56:55 (GMT)
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http://www.falcom.co.jp/novel_br/chapter2/br09.html contains the following: 護送用の馬車は、台車の上に木で組んだ檻が載っている. Not a train reference, however.
Selected response from:

Maynard Hogg
Japan
Local time: 02:50
Grading comment
Thanks. This is what I used.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5bogie
Nobuo Kawamura
3 +1Truck (US)/bogey (UK)snowbees
3 +1truckHiromasa Funaki
1 +3undercarriage
Maynard Hogg


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
bogie


Explanation:
台車 has different English equivalents. Bogie in railway industry, carriage in mining industry, dolly in electric industry etc.

Nobuo Kawamura
Japan
Local time: 02:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maynard Hogg: Dolly is the gloss that first springs to mind--the foldup kind used in so many Japanese offices.
6 hrs
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
台車
truck


Explanation:
Bogie is OK but somewhat definitive to "ボギー式台車", Bogie type truck.
I recommend to use "truck" when the "台車" might be different from "ボギー式台車"



    Reference: http://lavender.system.nitech.ac.jp/cgi-bin/rl_term.cgi?`tru...
Hiromasa Funaki
Japan
Local time: 02:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Japanese
PRO pts in category: 23

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maynard Hogg: Google has lots of references for "bogie truck." No "type" in English!
41 mins
  -> Thank you for your advice
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +3
undercarriage


Explanation:
You didn't mention the intended audience. Stockholders and other general readerships are likely to not know this sense of "bogie" and to misinterpret "truck."

Context is everything.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-03 02:48:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Snowbee raises another point: Using too technical a term risks running into UK/US variations.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-03 02:52:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Undercarriage also includes the frame connecting the truck to the superstructure, driving linkages, etc. Does the rest of the document cover that or concentrate just on the wheels staying on the track/guideway?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-03 02:56:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.falcom.co.jp/novel_br/chapter2/br09.html contains the following: 護送用の馬車は、台車の上に木で組んだ檻が載っている. Not a train reference, however.

Maynard Hogg
Japan
Local time: 02:50
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks. This is what I used.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Evan GEISINGER: Great point! First example of a new j->e translating rule.: if the otherwise obscure term can be guessed from the indiv. Kanji, the English shouldn't bee _too_ obscure, either, if pos., for non-techie readerships
3 mins

agree  Hiromasa Funaki: exactly if for ordinary people.
12 mins

agree  Kurt Hammond: This is the most general character and will be understood by all.
1 day12 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
台車
Truck (US)/bogey (UK)


Explanation:
Google search of plugging "define truck." Called "bogey" oustside the U.S. Usage often differs between U.S. and U.K., regarding railroad engineering.

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Note added at 6 hrs 9 mins (2004-03-03 07:04:52 GMT)
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Correction: A majaor Japanese manufacturer, Sumitomo Metal, calls 台車 as ¥"bogie truck,¥" and this seems a generally accepted terminology.

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Note added at 1 day 2 hrs 33 mins (2004-03-04 03:29:24 GMT)
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Important: Anchoy¥'s question is not about conventional railroad system or technology; it is about various transit guideway modes like RRT, LRT. Thus various modes of a bogie. See Reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_mover

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Note added at 1 day 4 hrs 4 mins (2004-03-04 04:59:59 GMT)
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More reference about various transit guideway modes.
http://www.lightrailnow.org/facts/fa_monorail003.htm

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Note added at 1 day 7 hrs 11 mins (2004-03-04 08:06:56 GMT)
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Another reference: technology of guided transport. This is a must-read.¥"

http://www.jrtr.net/jrtr26/pdf/t58_neh.pdf

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Note added at 1 day 9 hrs 25 mins (2004-03-04 10:21:22 GMT)
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Correction: after preparing additional notes, I must change my answer as ¥"bogie or railroad truck.¥"

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Note added at 2 days 7 hrs 48 mins (2004-03-05 08:44:49 GMT)
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Transit guideway modes like Maglev call it ¥"chassis.¥" Thus my final answer.


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=define:truck
snowbees
Local time: 02:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maynard Hogg: I suspected as much. The first paper reference at hand, however, was British.
22 mins

agree  Dave REESE: Yeah, I think "chassis" sums it up pretty well. It's accurate, and easy enough for both professionals and laypersons understand the meaning. Good job!
51 days
  -> Dave, thanks for your comment.
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