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kyuni and ikinari

English translation: suddenly (state vs. action)

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06:47 May 23, 2002
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Japanese term or phrase: kyuni and ikinari
What's the difference between kyuni and ikinari?
xxxJennifer Owe
English translation:suddenly (state vs. action)
Explanation:

Ikinari expresses a certain surprise at something happening in front of the speaker catching him off guard; an event that is not supposed to happen
at that time.
'yonaka ni michi wo aruite itara ikinari nagurareta' ("While walking the streets at night I was suddenly hit")

'sono meeru wo akete mitara ikinari haado ga shokika sareta' ("When I opened that mail my HD was suddenly formatted.")

In contrast to this, kyuuni refers more to a quick change of state. i.e. 'kyuu ni sora ga hareta' ("The skies suddenly cleared").



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-23 07:06:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

When describing the same sort of event, \'kyuu ni\' still has a bit more of a coordinated feel to it:
(in 3rd person:)
\'kyuu ni bureeki wo kakeru\'
\'ikinari bureeki wo kakeru\'
Selected response from:

Ad Timmering
Local time: 19:08
Grading comment
Thank you guys for your time and useful debate.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6ininari has more nuance of lack of anticipation than kyuni
Nobuo Kawamura
4 +4suddenly/sudden
ejprotran
4 +1against the natural development vs. without prior noticemkj
3 +1suddenly (state vs. action)Ad Timmering


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
suddenly (state vs. action)


Explanation:

Ikinari expresses a certain surprise at something happening in front of the speaker catching him off guard; an event that is not supposed to happen
at that time.
'yonaka ni michi wo aruite itara ikinari nagurareta' ("While walking the streets at night I was suddenly hit")

'sono meeru wo akete mitara ikinari haado ga shokika sareta' ("When I opened that mail my HD was suddenly formatted.")

In contrast to this, kyuuni refers more to a quick change of state. i.e. 'kyuu ni sora ga hareta' ("The skies suddenly cleared").



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-23 07:06:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

When describing the same sort of event, \'kyuu ni\' still has a bit more of a coordinated feel to it:
(in 3rd person:)
\'kyuu ni bureeki wo kakeru\'
\'ikinari bureeki wo kakeru\'

Ad Timmering
Local time: 19:08
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 36
Grading comment
Thank you guys for your time and useful debate.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Mike Sekine: not sure about the "an event that is no supposed to happen" part
44 mins
  -> Not supposed to happen, as in the natural order of things. When the sun goes down it can 'kyuuni kuraku naru' but not ikinari. That was sort of the nuance I tried to express;)

agree  Yoshiro Shibasaki, PhD
3 hrs

agree  mkj
14 hrs

disagree  meehan: I agree with Mr Sekine. This is one of those somewhat broadly interpretable expressions. To me, ikinari has a more unexpected sense than kyuni.
1 day10 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
ininari has more nuance of lack of anticipation than kyuni


Explanation:
Both mean suddenly, all of a sudden.
but ikinari has a nuance that one had never anticipated what had been coming.
Usually trafic accidents happen "ikinari" rather than "kyuni".



Nobuo Kawamura
Japan
Local time: 02:08
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 483

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Katsuhiko KAKUNO, Ph.D.
9 mins

agree  Mike Sekine
42 mins

agree  Yoshiro Shibasaki, PhD
3 hrs

agree  napiko
7 hrs

agree  tmmmrt
7 hrs

agree  hikaru
8 hrs

neutral  Katalin Horváth McClure: Hmmm. Then why 「その子は急に道に飛び出してきた。」and also 「急に飛行機の機体が傾いた。」are listed as samples in the Shogakukan's Bright J-E dictionary under 「急に」?
10 hrs
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
against the natural development vs. without prior notice


Explanation:
My Japanese thesaurus explains the difference as follows;
急に(kyuuni)・・・suddenly without prior notice or signs
ex. Kyuu ni byouki ni naru. (You fall ill suddenly.) Illness happens suddenly, but it's a natural part of life, too.

いきなり(ikinari)・・・suddenly against the natural development of things
ex. Giron shiteiru uchi, ikinari aite o naguritsuketa. (In the midst of the debate, he suddenly started hitting the opponent.)
You don't anticipate a normal person to start attacking the other person during a debate. Well, I would use "ikinari" for what Mike Tyson did (biting off his boxing opponent's ear)during a match. 

mkj
United States
Local time: 10:08
PRO pts in pair: 159

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LEXICON KK: haha, good example. i wonder if Tyson will "ikinari" do something strange out of the blue against Lewis next month!
9 hrs
  -> Yeah, now that he has gold teeth to bite better with. He has done it once, so it wouldn't be a surprise anymore, though.
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
suddenly/sudden


Explanation:
Jennifer,

These two words are interchangeable in many situations, especially when you want to express that a thing happens so suddenly. For example, if you see a baby crying suddenly, you can say both 1) akachan ga KYUNI nakidashita and 2) akachan ga IKINARI nakidashita. It doesn稚 matter if you were EXPECTING the baby to start crying or NOT before the things actually happen. In other words, you don稚 need to worry too much about whether you were expecting a thing to happen or not when choosing either one. However, there is a certain situation where you need to be careful about which word you should choose. Suppose you see a man who took a driving test without any practices. You could say that kare wa IKINARI testo o wuketa. It would sound more appropriate if you used IKINARI rather than KYUNI. In this case, using KYUNI lacks the nuance of 努ithout any practices.

ejprotran
Local time: 02:08
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 143

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Naomi Ota
8 hrs

agree  LEXICON KK: well said
8 hrs

agree  Ad Timmering
1 day12 hrs

agree  Katalin Horváth McClure: Amen.
5 days
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