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バリアフリー

English translation: barrier free

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:バリアフリー
English translation:barrier free
Entered by: Wei Peng Loy
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07:44 Jul 3, 2002
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Japanese term or phrase: バリアフリー
Is the English for バリアフリー barrier-free? Or is there another better way of saying it? Somehow, I think that barrier-free is a Japanized English word.

It is used in the sentence describing that this place is designed with the needs of disabled person in mind.
Wei Peng Loy
Local time: 04:39
BARRIER FREE
Explanation:
barrier free (as in barrier-free washrooms)

This expression is totally acceptable outside of Japan, too. It's just a new expression even in the States, so some people use it with parentheses. (I'm not sure which country started using this expression first, though.)

As far as the USA is concerned, it started with the 1990 ADA, federal civil rights law. They talk about a society that's free of "barriers" for physically and mentally disabled and also for senior citizens.

It's a new and positive expression that says a lot more than "disabled access".

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Note added at 2002-07-04 06:31:05 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Typo: ...some people use it with QUOTATION MARKS.
Selected response from:

mkj
United States
Local time: 13:39
Grading comment
Thank you all.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1That's OK.
kokuritsu
4 +1BARRIER FREEmkj
4universal accessJohn Senior
4a house designed for ease of access or trouble free accessProjectset


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
That's OK.


Explanation:
You can safely say "barrier-free" in English.
Google hits more than 80,000 "barrier-free."


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Note added at 2002-07-03 09:10:35 (GMT)
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Please note there\'s a difference in the usage of \"barrier-free\" and \"universal design.\" The concept of \"b-f\" is to dissolve substantial barriers disturbing the daily life of elderly and physically impaired persons, while that of \"u-d\" is to remove barriers by creating products and environments people can use without trouble regardless of whether they are physically impaired or not. Let me take a shampoo container, a typical example of \"u-d\", the side of which is notched to tell from a rinsing container.

kokuritsu
Local time: 05:39
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese
PRO pts in pair: 248

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Shinya Ono: A very clear explanation of b-f and u-d. Thank you.
2 hrs
  -> So glad to hear that.
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28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
universal access


Explanation:
Barrier-free is fine. Another way to say it is "accessible to all".

If you need a noun, "universal access" is a term that seems to crop up a lot.

John Senior
Local time: 05:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 15
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a house designed for ease of access or trouble free access


Explanation:
If used in connection with a house, it would mean a house designed for ease of access or trouble free access by an invalid or elderly person (e.g. all one level or no steps etc).

Projectset
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
BARRIER FREE


Explanation:
barrier free (as in barrier-free washrooms)

This expression is totally acceptable outside of Japan, too. It's just a new expression even in the States, so some people use it with parentheses. (I'm not sure which country started using this expression first, though.)

As far as the USA is concerned, it started with the 1990 ADA, federal civil rights law. They talk about a society that's free of "barriers" for physically and mentally disabled and also for senior citizens.

It's a new and positive expression that says a lot more than "disabled access".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-04 06:31:05 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Typo: ...some people use it with QUOTATION MARKS.


    Reference: http://janweb.icdi.wvu.edu/kinder/overview.htm
    Reference: http://www.cleanlink.com/NR/Nr2s7ji.html
mkj
United States
Local time: 13:39
PRO pts in pair: 159
Grading comment
Thank you all.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Katsuhiko KAKUNO, Ph.D.
23 hrs
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