KudoZ home » Japanese to English » Other

HARAKIRI

English translation: Japanese = Suicide

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Japanese term or phrase:HARAKIRI
English translation:Japanese = Suicide
Entered by: erhan ucgun
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

07:11 Aug 20, 2002
Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Japanese term or phrase: HARAKIRI
if you don't come to me I do harakiri.
SANDRA
Japanese = Suicide
Explanation:
....
Selected response from:

erhan ucgun
Local time: 02:32
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +10Japanese = Suicideerhan ucgun
5 +7(Suicide by) self-disembowlementShinya Ono
5 +2Suicide
Craig Hills


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
Japanese = Suicide


Explanation:
....

erhan ucgun
Local time: 02:32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Piotr Kurek: ritual suicide to avoid disgrace aka seppuku
4 mins
  -> thx piotr

agree  murat karahan: I don't know anything about Javanese but agree with Piotr. suicide for explanation or SEPPUKU. I'd go with seppuku.
30 mins
  -> 

agree  Erika Grzincic-Baumgart M.A.: Yes, itエs a ritual suicide - I agree with Piotr
1 hr
  -> thx

agree  Estella
1 hr
  -> thx

agree  Ebru Ozgen Oglesbay: san
1 hr
  -> 

agree  Jos Essers
3 hrs
  -> thanks

agree  Shinya Ono: Metaphorically, it is correct. And so much of language is metaphorical. And if you are using it as an Anglicized Japanese word, it can be used to mean suicide in general. I agree.
3 hrs

neutral  1964: No translation Harakiri is harakiri in almost all language including Turkish, it is quite strage finding any person unaware of this word
4 hrs
  -> 

agree  xxxjsl
7 hrs

agree  yamamoto
3 days18 hrs

agree  Craig Hills
12 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
(Suicide by) self-disembowlement


Explanation:
A very well-defined form of suicide.
Ref. Kenkyushha J-E dictionary

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-20 09:52:05 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you commit suicide by other means than harakiri or seppuku ,it\'s called \"jisatsu\" (a general term), \"jiketsu,\" \"jigai,\" \"jisai,\" etc. If a military officer kills himself with a pistol or by cutting his throat, it was called \"jiketsu\" (self-decision), not harakiri. Metaphorically, you may use the term to refer to suicide in general, but, then, it can be used to refer to resignation from an important post as well. But, it is best to be specific, I think.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-20 11:05:04 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ref. Also, Shogakukan Random House E-J Dictionary for Anglicized \"harakiri\" (seppuku).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-20 11:11:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Self-correction: Speaking broadly (not metaphorically), it is suicide, but of a very specific kind. It is like if someone asks what is \"otoko,\" and I answer, it means a human being (instead of saying, a man, a male, etc.) Refering to resignation as harakiri is a metaphor.

Shinya Ono
United States
Local time: 08:32
PRO pts in pair: 119

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  erhan ucgun: it seems the japanese has a specific suicidal literature :))
1 hr
  -> It's fine to have literature, but shameful to allow more than 30,000 persons to kill themselves each year! Thank you, it's amazing to see so many veteran translators from Turkey, rest of Europe, here!

agree  xxxjsl
5 hrs
  -> It's amazing to look at some of our colleagues from Europe and Turkey (which I still like to think of as part of Asia).

agree  Mike Sekine: I wish there was a knife sharp enough to penetrate my flab.
7 hrs
  -> Well, I lost 15kg in 5 years. You have a plenty of time.

agree  Kaori Myatt
14 hrs
  -> Thank you. From such a versatile translator who can handle Portuguese and French, too.

agree  Naomi Ota
1 day3 hrs
  -> ありがとうございます。

agree  Eva Blanar: Harakiri already is the 'international'/'foreign' name for seppuku.
1 day5 hrs
  -> You are quite right. Thank you.

agree  Craig Hills
12 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Suicide


Explanation:
Note: added mainly for the background and lonks.

Harakiri literally translated means belly cut, (hara = belly, and kiri is from kiru = to cut)

Hara-kiri ¥Ha"ra-ki`ri¥, n. [Jap., stomach cutting.] Suicide, by slashing the abdomen, formerly practiced in Japan, and commanded by the government in the cases of disgraced officials; disembowelment; -- also written, but incorrectly, {hari-kari}.

Harakiri

alternative words: Seppuku, Hara kiri
keywords: law
related topics: Sengoku period , Edo period , Bushido
related web sites: http://www.mm-taiga.com/genrock/service/taiga/top/g_club/dai... , http://members.tripod.co.jp/yanparayanyanyan/index-5.html
explanation: Suicide method practiced by samurai, which consists to cut off his own abdominal. During Sengoku period, harakiri was considered a way to show the courage when his lost a battle. When a peace arrived with Edo period, it was formalized and became a kind of punishment for samurai. In this case, the jailer cut off the head of a condemned, when the latter began just a gesture. The last famous harakiri is committed by a Japanese novelist Mishima Yukio in November 1970.

Almost 1500 Google hits:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=history o...

Also Ask Jeeves:
http://webster.directhit.com/webster/search.aspx?qry=hara-ki...

The best of which is probably:
http://www.encyclopedia.com/html/h1/harakiri.asp

(h舐エe-kerエe, harエe-) [Jap.,belly-cutting], the traditional Japanese form of honorable suicide, also known by its Chinese equivalent, seppuku. It was practiced by the Japanese feudal warrior class in order to avoid falling into enemy hands. Around 1500, it became a privileged alternative to execution, granted to daimyo and samurai guilty of disloyalty to the emperor. The condemned man received a jeweled dagger from the emperor. He selected as his second a faithful friend, received official witnesses, and plunged the dagger into the left side of his abdomen, drew it across to the right, and made a slight cut upward; his second then beheaded him with one stroke of a sword, and the dagger was returned to the emperor. Around 1700, it became permissible to go through a semblance of disembowelment prior to beheading. Voluntary hara-kiri was resorted to after a private misfortune, out of loyalty to a dead master, or to protest the conduct of a living superior. Obligatory hara-kiri was abolished in 1868, but its voluntary form has persisted. It was performed by 40 military men in 1895 as a protest against the return of conquered territory, the Liaotung peninsula, to China; by General Nogi on the death of Emperor Meiji in 1912; and by numerous soldiers as an alternative to surrender in World War II. Hara-kiri was much discussed in recent years in connection with the death, in 1970, of Mishima , the well-known novelist and rightist political leader.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-21 07:38:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, as an addition try this in Japanese:

if you don¥'t come to me I do harakiri = 私に来なければ、腹切をするぞ。

(I think comments from our native speakers is needed here, comments please.)


    Reference: http://www.hikyaku.com/dico/histxtg12.html
    Reference: http://ezdragon.cortland.edu/archives/dp/dp39/39_03.htm
Craig Hills
Local time: 08:32
PRO pts in pair: 26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Shinya Ono: What can I say? You could write a book on it. I can see you are fascinated by it!
38 mins
  -> Thank you kindly. Having just married a lovelly Japanese woman, I'm very interested in all aspects of Japanese culture, (so I have quite a bit of reference material and links already collected). As for the language, I've still a long way to go!?

agree  tunturi
1 day1 hr
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search