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"Gekitsuyoino"

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03:25 Oct 24, 2006
This question was closed without grading. Reason: No acceptable answer

Japanese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Slang / Japanese youth, college and street slang
Japanese term or phrase: "Gekitsuyoino"
Hello. I was told by jobjg that "Gekitsuyoino" is a slang term for "tough guy". Is there a shorter way or ways to say this term? Please let me know. Thank you. :D
xxxMavericker
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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Extremely strong guy(s)
humbird
2geki tsuyo (??)Minoru Kuwahara


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Gekitsuyoino
geki tsuyo (??)


Explanation:
Hello Marvericker,

I needed to read several times the phrase before understanding what it means. I don't know if it is a slang or not, but that suggests that someone or something is "super strong" as **possibly** rephrased as "geki tsuyo" or something like that. "geki" connotes extremity (e.g. "geki kara" meaning "extremely hot" in reference to curry, ramen or other spicy foods). "tsuyo" is not a correct term, but it is a stem of an adjective "tsuyoi" translated as a word "strong".

I don't know how you may want to use the phrase, but I do not assume there is a fixed way of shortening it. Being shortened, it ends up not a gramatically-proper usage of language, however, I observe some colloquial Japanese terms are abbreviated by picking up the first few phonetic syllables of each term composing it.

As an example, I already picked up "geki kara" above. "geki" could be combined with another kanji to note something is extreme in nature, while "kara" is a stem of an adjective "karai" meaning very spicy in taste. Another similar one is "geki yasu" directly translated as "extremely cheap" meaning "bargain", "good buy", etc. Therefore, my suggestion, but others may have different ideas.


HTH


    Reference: http://www.google.co.jp/search?num=50&hl=ja&as_qdr=all&q=%22...
    Reference: http://www.google.co.jp/search?num=50&hl=ja&as_qdr=all&q=%22...
Minoru Kuwahara
Japan
Local time: 19:19
Native speaker of: Japanese
Notes to answerer
Asker: HI. to answer your question: Jobjg used this sentence: Gekitsuyoino ga kita - "a totally strong one came"

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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Gekitsuyoino
Extremely strong guy(s)


Explanation:
Geki 激 -------- this means "extremely" adv. as it is followed by adj. Another example is 激安 (extremely cheap).
tsuyoi 強い ------- stong, tough, carougeous, etc. See my answer to your another question.
no の ------- probably this is short for "者、もの"

This is truly basterdized Japanese, so I would agree this must be a slang.

Again I must suggest language pair reverse. The source word is not English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2006-10-24 14:51:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Typo in "carougeous" -- courageous

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Can Altinbay: Sounds good to me.
1 hr
  -> Hi Can, thank you!
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Voters for reclassification
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PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (3): michiko tsumura, humbird, hinata


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Changes made by editors
Oct 25, 2006 - Changes made by hinata:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO
Oct 24, 2006 - Changes made by humbird:
Language pairEnglish to Japanese » Japanese to English


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