KudoZ home » Japanese to English » Tourism & Travel

あそばっしゃい

English translation: Come and play 'til your heart's content

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
17:59 Mar 30, 2007
Japanese to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Tourism & Travel / Guide Map
Japanese term or phrase: あそばっしゃい
I need you guys to put on your creative hats.
A play on 「いらっしゃい」、 this one word
is splashed across the cover of a guide map/ pamphlet
for a resort. What would be a snappier, more
alluring way of translating this, other than just
"Welcome!", or, "Come Play Your Heart Out!" ?

Additionally, 食わっしゃい and 乗らっしゃい appear
elsewhere in the project, so if possible, I should
be thematically consistent.

どうぞ、考えらっしゃい!
Joe L
United States
Local time: 05:41
English translation:Come and play 'til your heart's content
Explanation:
Just another option. You can use this with the others you mentioned, too.
I.e. "Eat 'til your heart's content" and "Ride 'til your heart's content". Poetic license has been taken, of course. It may not fit in the context, as they may not be encouraging you to actually stay all day. Anyway...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2007-03-31 04:32:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, and "play" might be substituted with "enjoy yourself" depending on what kind of resort it is.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day6 hrs (2007-04-01 00:00:13 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Ha, ha. It was probably your wording that influenced my thinking in the first place. :D Glad you liked it, though. :)
Selected response from:

casey
United States
Local time: 07:41
Grading comment
Well, I'm certainly grateful to the large number of colleagues who weighed in on my question. But apparently there wasn't one particular answer which everyone liked/ agreed upon. Casey's answer would seem to validate my own original wording. I didn't feel comfortable with it on my own, but I'm comfortable with Casey's judgement. It is a tad long; I'll just shorten it touch.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +2Have a good time!
Emil Eugen Pop
3 +2Come join the fun!
Joyce A
4 +1Come visit us, have fun!
humbird
3 +1Come and xxx
RieM
3 +1Come and play 'til your heart's content
casey
2 +1Come Play with UsYasu Hosomatsu


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Have a good time!


Explanation:
Toyama dialect form
for 遊んできなさい。


Emil Eugen Pop
Local time: 14:41
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sigmalanguage: Yes. I cannot attest that it's from Toyama, but it is either a dialect or intended to sound like one. あそばっしゃい is probably just an imperative form of あそぶ with no or little connotation of "come".
8 hrs

agree  casey
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Come Play with Us


Explanation:
Just a suggestion.

Yasu Hosomatsu
Local time: 04:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Japanese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RieM: 私の答えよりいいなと思いました。一票。
7 mins

neutral  humbird: It's interesting 'cause this is exactly what I was thinking before I submit my answer. But voted against as it's not necessary to stick with the idea of "play". Besides I don't think the resort people actually come out and play with visitors.
51 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Come visit us, have fun!


Explanation:
I don't know what area of Japan, but this is a dialect. As we know well, expression such as these, away from standard languages adds a pep to the talk.
As you pointed out this is a "directive" expression, but in tourist brochure it cannot push the "ordering" tone so outright. This kind of wording really gives it a human touch, and could be very appealing (to Japanese people).
Here we need a little cross-cultural consideration.

Sidenote: Derivation of しゃい in いらっしゃい is not same as this example. But if あそばっしゃい is played with it, sure it is a clever pun.

humbird
Native speaker of: Native in JapaneseJapanese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for the side note. I stand corrected.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  casey: Maybe "and" instead of a comma, though.
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Come and xxx


Explanation:
I know many Japanese travel guides have the expression like "Let's 沖縄" or something with レッツ. But that's for them... So, how about Come and Ride, Come and eat,.... The exception is you cannot say Come and Welcome ;-)



RieM
United States
Local time: 07:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Japanese
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  casey
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Come join the fun!


Explanation:
Hi Joe! Here is another option for you--a little shorter. Looks like you have a fun translation there.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs (2007-03-30 23:47:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I just got up and was a little fuzzy. You have two others ones that need to be mingled in : 食わっしゃい and 乗らっしゃい

How about this trio?
Come join the fun! Come join the food! Come join the rides!



Joyce A
Thailand
Local time: 18:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  casey
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, casey! :)

agree  V N Ganesh: How about 'Come enjoy the Food,Fun and Frolic'?
12 hrs
  -> Hi Ganesh! Thank you. And, that's very alliterative. :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Come and play 'til your heart's content


Explanation:
Just another option. You can use this with the others you mentioned, too.
I.e. "Eat 'til your heart's content" and "Ride 'til your heart's content". Poetic license has been taken, of course. It may not fit in the context, as they may not be encouraging you to actually stay all day. Anyway...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2007-03-31 04:32:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oh, and "play" might be substituted with "enjoy yourself" depending on what kind of resort it is.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day6 hrs (2007-04-01 00:00:13 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Ha, ha. It was probably your wording that influenced my thinking in the first place. :D Glad you liked it, though. :)

casey
United States
Local time: 07:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Well, I'm certainly grateful to the large number of colleagues who weighed in on my question. But apparently there wasn't one particular answer which everyone liked/ agreed upon. Casey's answer would seem to validate my own original wording. I didn't feel comfortable with it on my own, but I'm comfortable with Casey's judgement. It is a tad long; I'll just shorten it touch.
Notes to answerer
Asker: As per Sigmalanguage's comment to Emil, I'll probably drop the "Come and" and begin with "Play...". for brevity's sake.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RieM: yeah, I like the "'til..." part.
9 hrs
  -> Thanks :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (3): casey, Joyce A, sigmalanguage


Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Mar 31, 2007 - Changes made by sigmalanguage:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search