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South Korea/North Korea

English translation: South Korea / North Korea

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Korean term or phrase:Nam Guk / Buk Han
English translation:South Korea / North Korea
Entered by: R. A. Stegemann
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10:58 Jul 3, 2002
Korean to English translations [PRO]
/ language, history, politics
Korean term or phrase: South Korea/North Korea
Hi again,

This is a follow-up question to my last one on the difference between Tae Han Min Guk and Han Guk.

How do South Koreans typically refer to North Korea? In Japan the most common expression is Kita Chosen, where Kita means North.

Although it would make sense to write Nan (South) Chosen in Japanese, it is never done. Do South Koreans ever refer to their own country in similar manner?

Finally, when South Koreans refer to North Korea, do they use different expressions to convey different attitudes toward the North. If so, what are they, and how are they used?

Once again, as I have CKJ fonts installed into my computer you are welcome to use Sino-Japanese characters, but please do not use Hangul, as I will not be able to understand.
R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 00:06
Please, see the explanation
Explanation:
Usually, North Korea is referred to as "Buk Han": Buk meaning north and Han standing for Korea. However, South Korea is not usually referred to as "Nam Han"( South Korea) as the previous translator has indicated: rather it is referred to as simply "Han Kuk" meaning "Korea". However, he or she is right when he indicates that North Korea referes itself as "Buk chosun" and they call South Korea as "Nam Chosun".
Japanese call South Koreans as Gangokujin, which is Hankuin( Korean): they are the same Chinese characters but pronounced differently. But the Japanese still call the North Koreans as " Kita Chosen".
I hope this brief explanation helps you.
Selected response from:

TJ
United States
Local time: 08:06
Grading comment
I would like to thank Hazel once again for her assistance, but this time I must award my points to TJ, as his/her answer provided me with the greatest clarity and amount of information. For example, I had never heard of the expression Ibuk, and the use of Nam in NamBukHan probably cannot be equated with NamHan.

Well, in any case, I wish there had been more discussion.


4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1Please, see the explanationTJ
4North Korea is enough.Hazel Shin


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
North Korea is enough.


Explanation:
In Korean, it's "Buk Han", here, Buk means north and Han means Korea.
Usually, we use "Buk Han" for North Korea and "Nam Han" for South Korea.

We never use expressions such as "Nam Chosun". This is north Korean's manner.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-04 13:51:25 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I do not agree with one of the below answer: \"South Korea is not usually referred to as \"Nam Han\"( South Korea)\".
Why not? We use Nam Han when it pursues the meanings against Buk Han.
This expression is frequetly used via mass media, for example, Nam Buk Han.
Unfortunately, in that point, TJ\'s answer is wrong.

Regards,


Hazel Shin
South Korea
Local time: 23:36
Native speaker of: Native in KoreanKorean
PRO pts in pair: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Please, see the explanation


Explanation:
Usually, North Korea is referred to as "Buk Han": Buk meaning north and Han standing for Korea. However, South Korea is not usually referred to as "Nam Han"( South Korea) as the previous translator has indicated: rather it is referred to as simply "Han Kuk" meaning "Korea". However, he or she is right when he indicates that North Korea referes itself as "Buk chosun" and they call South Korea as "Nam Chosun".
Japanese call South Koreans as Gangokujin, which is Hankuin( Korean): they are the same Chinese characters but pronounced differently. But the Japanese still call the North Koreans as " Kita Chosen".
I hope this brief explanation helps you.

TJ
United States
Local time: 08:06
PRO pts in pair: 7
Grading comment
I would like to thank Hazel once again for her assistance, but this time I must award my points to TJ, as his/her answer provided me with the greatest clarity and amount of information. For example, I had never heard of the expression Ibuk, and the use of Nam in NamBukHan probably cannot be equated with NamHan.

Well, in any case, I wish there had been more discussion.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Projectset: Additionally, in South Korea, they often call Nortrh Korea as 'Ibuk'. It means 'north of the border line'.
10 hrs
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