ProZ.com global directory of translation services
 The translation workplace
Ideas
KudoZ home » Latin to English » Art/Literary

quaeque ipsa miserrima vidi, et quorum pars magna fui

English translation: ... and those terrible things I saw, and in which I played a great part.

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:quaeque ipsa miserrima vidi, et quorum pars magna fui
English translation:... and those terrible things I saw, and in which I played a great part.
Entered by: Chris Rowson
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

01:17 Jun 21, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: quaeque ipsa miserrima vidi, et quorum pars magna fui
This phrase appears in It by Stephen King, please translate it for me. It is simply an epigram (if I remember my literary terms correctly). Another epigram that appears underneath this latin is "You dont f*** around with the infinite." if that's any help to you. Thank you.
Anna
... and those terrible thiings I saw, and in which I played a great part.
Explanation:
This comes from the Roman poet Vergil, in the Aeneid, which tells the story of Aeneas and his journeys from the ruins of Troy, leading to Italy and the supposed founding of Rome. This was how the Romans believed their city originated.

Book 2 of the Aeneid begins with a scene in which Aeneas speaks to the assembled Carthaginians. At this point he has been travelling seven years and finally wound up in Carthage.

He has just spent a passionate night with the beautiful and unhappy Queen Dido ("she took him to her arms
With greedy pleasure, and devour'd his charms"). The next day, the Carthaginians want to know the story of this sudden arrival who has melted their queen, and she invites him to speak to the assembled people (that´s the end of Book 1).

Book 2 starts ("continued from our last") saying they all look at him expectantly, and he says "Great queen, what you command me to relate
Renews the sad remembrance of our fate:
An empire from its old foundations rent,
And ev'ry woe the Trojans underwent;
A peopled city made a desart place;
All that I saw, and part of which I was: ..."

At least that´s how he starts in Dryden´s translation. Your quotation is the "all that I say ..." My own translation is more literal. Notice that is is the second half of a sentence.

The joke is, though, that Stephen King seems to have been working from the same translation as provided by Ms. Bell on her tripod homepage, and quoted by Evert above, because that´s the way that makes the best sense of his "f***" continuation. It´s not really a correct translation though! :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-22 05:50:30 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

You´re welcome :-)

I enjoy the Latin questions here, because they make me revive the Latin I learnt a long time ago and have largely forgotten, although it is still deeply embedded in the way I think about language.

Here´s a link that you might like if you want to learn some:
http://www.du.edu/~jcalvert/classics/latin/learnlat.htm#inde...
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 14:33
Grading comment
thank you very much ... i need to learn latin

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3I have seen many disasters in which I have played a great part
Evert DELOOF-SYS
4 +2... and those terrible thiings I saw, and in which I played a great part.Chris Rowson


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
I have seen many disasters in which I have played a great part


Explanation:
In such cases, just enter your quotation at e.g. www.google.com and, when you're lucky, you'll get an immedioate result

Ref.:
... Quaeque ipsa miserrima vidi Et quorum pars magna fui." (“I have seen
many disasters in which I have played a great part.”) Virgil. ...

members.tripod.com/~KathrynBell/Quotations.html

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 14:33
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SwissTell
49 mins

agree  Chris Rowson: The trouble with this method is that the translations you get are sometimes bad, and sometimes plain wrong. THis one is more an interpretation than really a translation, and it does not respect the first half of the sentence.
2 hrs
  -> Agree, yet the '...f***' underneath made me decide not to worry too much about literal translations here

agree  jessifay: I agree with your translation, but the "don't f*** around" underneath was not a translation of the Latin, it's a quote from a movie called Mean Streets.
833 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
... and those terrible thiings I saw, and in which I played a great part.


Explanation:
This comes from the Roman poet Vergil, in the Aeneid, which tells the story of Aeneas and his journeys from the ruins of Troy, leading to Italy and the supposed founding of Rome. This was how the Romans believed their city originated.

Book 2 of the Aeneid begins with a scene in which Aeneas speaks to the assembled Carthaginians. At this point he has been travelling seven years and finally wound up in Carthage.

He has just spent a passionate night with the beautiful and unhappy Queen Dido ("she took him to her arms
With greedy pleasure, and devour'd his charms"). The next day, the Carthaginians want to know the story of this sudden arrival who has melted their queen, and she invites him to speak to the assembled people (that´s the end of Book 1).

Book 2 starts ("continued from our last") saying they all look at him expectantly, and he says "Great queen, what you command me to relate
Renews the sad remembrance of our fate:
An empire from its old foundations rent,
And ev'ry woe the Trojans underwent;
A peopled city made a desart place;
All that I saw, and part of which I was: ..."

At least that´s how he starts in Dryden´s translation. Your quotation is the "all that I say ..." My own translation is more literal. Notice that is is the second half of a sentence.

The joke is, though, that Stephen King seems to have been working from the same translation as provided by Ms. Bell on her tripod homepage, and quoted by Evert above, because that´s the way that makes the best sense of his "f***" continuation. It´s not really a correct translation though! :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-22 05:50:30 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

You´re welcome :-)

I enjoy the Latin questions here, because they make me revive the Latin I learnt a long time ago and have largely forgotten, although it is still deeply embedded in the way I think about language.

Here´s a link that you might like if you want to learn some:
http://www.du.edu/~jcalvert/classics/latin/learnlat.htm#inde...

Chris Rowson
Local time: 14:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 49
Grading comment
thank you very much ... i need to learn latin

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  senesino83
4 hrs

agree  Egmont
253 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also: