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pro maleficiis beneficia

English translation: Repay evil with good.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:pro maleficiis beneficia
English translation:Repay evil with good.
Entered by: David Wigtil
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11:40 Jul 3, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: pro maleficiis beneficia
School motto
nicky temperton
Repay evil with good.
Explanation:
This is a motto (and a very nice one!), so there is no Latin verb expressed. English prefers verbs, so I've inserted "repay". Without it, the English would have to be, "Good deeds in return for evil deeds."

PRO means "in exchange for, in return for," as in the modern Spanish POR (one always says, "Muchas gracias por su ayuda," for instance).

The preposition "pro" requires an ablative complement, so the neuter plural MALEFICIA, "evil things, wicked deeds," is altered appropriately.

BENEFICIA is the neuter plural, "good things, good deeds."

--Loquamur
Ph. D. in ancient Greek, college professor of Latin, Greek, German, Spanish, and French.

Selected response from:

David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 11:14
Grading comment
My O-level latin failed me with this motto, I'm afraid. I felt that your explanation was the most 'likely' translation, given that it is a school motto. Thank you for your full explanation - I shall enjoy being able to answer this likely quiz question!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Repay evil with good.
David Wigtil
5 +1Good deeds actions are the answer to evil onesAdam Bartley
5"boon for harm" or "great pains for small thanks"cca
4 +1good things come from bad ones
CLS Lexi-tech


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
good things come from bad ones


Explanation:
this is the literal sense of the mottol perhaps you can find a more adverbial or proverbial (idiomatic) way to say this in English.

paola l m
civis romanus sum

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 11:14
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot: every cloud has a silver lining?
29 mins
  -> very nice!

disagree  David Wigtil: The word PRO means "in exchange for."
59 mins
  -> Thank you for correcting me

agree  Piotr Kurek
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Repay evil with good.


Explanation:
This is a motto (and a very nice one!), so there is no Latin verb expressed. English prefers verbs, so I've inserted "repay". Without it, the English would have to be, "Good deeds in return for evil deeds."

PRO means "in exchange for, in return for," as in the modern Spanish POR (one always says, "Muchas gracias por su ayuda," for instance).

The preposition "pro" requires an ablative complement, so the neuter plural MALEFICIA, "evil things, wicked deeds," is altered appropriately.

BENEFICIA is the neuter plural, "good things, good deeds."

--Loquamur
Ph. D. in ancient Greek, college professor of Latin, Greek, German, Spanish, and French.



David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 11:14
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 19
Grading comment
My O-level latin failed me with this motto, I'm afraid. I felt that your explanation was the most 'likely' translation, given that it is a school motto. Thank you for your full explanation - I shall enjoy being able to answer this likely quiz question!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Rowson
1 day20 hrs

agree  Egmont
241 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
"boon for harm" or "great pains for small thanks"


Explanation:
pro: 1. in stead of 2. in reply to, for (it's a preposition, allways followed by ablative: maleficiis)
Maleficium and beneficium are opposite notions. They are derived from the verb 'facere' (to do, to make).
In view of the double meaning of 'pro', two interpretations are possible: 1. Someone would expect harm, but in stead of it he gets boon.
2. Someone harmed another, but the other in reply gives something good.
I prefer the latter, better fitting a school motto, something as: "In spite of small thanks, we took great pains."

cca
Belgium
Local time: 17:14
PRO pts in pair: 4
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Good deeds actions are the answer to evil ones


Explanation:
Actually, I don't think we need to get too hung up on the meaning of "pro". As Latin has an active system of cases there is an argument that prepositions are often redundant. In this, the sense of the dative tells the bad actions are in some sense the indirect object of the good ones, i.e. that goood deeds are in some way a response to the bad but do not do something *directly* to them. The moral sense of it takes us the rest of the way! Hence the above. Flames and thoughts welcome.

Adam

Adam Bartley
Australia
Local time: 01:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CLS Lexi-tech: One bad turn deserves a good one, to coin a phrase ;-)
21 hrs
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