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cognito ergo sum

English translation: I think, therefore I am

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:cogito ergo sum
English translation:I think, therefore I am
Entered by: xxxOso
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00:46 Jan 27, 2003
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: cognito ergo sum
cognito ergo sum
lori weikel
I think, therefore I am
Explanation:
The phrase is in Latin.
Good luck from Oso ¶:^)

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Note added at 2003-01-27 00:53:09 (GMT)
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\"...Descartes was a student of mathematic reasoning, he believed that it was the path to a secure theory of knowledge. Descartes coined the phrase \"Cognito, ergo sum.\" (\"I think, therefore I am\") which was a conclusion that there was only one thing of which he could be certain; that he existed!...\"

http://www.swil.ocdsb.edu.on.ca/ModWest/HUMANISM/philosophy/...


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Note added at 2003-01-27 01:03:57 (GMT)
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As P. Forgas noted below, the correct spelling in Latin is: \"Cogito ergo sum\"

\"Cogito, ergo sum.
Descartes’ axiom. This is a petitio principii. “I think” can only prove this: that “I think.” And he might just as well infer from it the existence of thought as the existence of I. He is asked to prove the latter, and immediately assumes that it exists and does something, and then infers that it exists because it does something. Suppose I were asked to prove the existence of ice, and were to say, ice is cold, therefore there is such a thing as ice. Manifestly I first assume there is such a thing as ice, then ascribe to it an attribute, and then argue back that this attribute is the outcome of ice. This is not proof, but simply arguing in a circle...\"


http://www.bartleby.com/81/3821.html
Selected response from:

xxxOso
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +18I think, therefore I amxxxOso
5 +1I think, therefore I am
William Clough
5I learn, therefore I am
Magda Dziadosz


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +18
I think, therefore I am


Explanation:
The phrase is in Latin.
Good luck from Oso ¶:^)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-27 00:53:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"...Descartes was a student of mathematic reasoning, he believed that it was the path to a secure theory of knowledge. Descartes coined the phrase \"Cognito, ergo sum.\" (\"I think, therefore I am\") which was a conclusion that there was only one thing of which he could be certain; that he existed!...\"

http://www.swil.ocdsb.edu.on.ca/ModWest/HUMANISM/philosophy/...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-27 01:03:57 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As P. Forgas noted below, the correct spelling in Latin is: \"Cogito ergo sum\"

\"Cogito, ergo sum.
Descartes’ axiom. This is a petitio principii. “I think” can only prove this: that “I think.” And he might just as well infer from it the existence of thought as the existence of I. He is asked to prove the latter, and immediately assumes that it exists and does something, and then infers that it exists because it does something. Suppose I were asked to prove the existence of ice, and were to say, ice is cold, therefore there is such a thing as ice. Manifestly I first assume there is such a thing as ice, then ascribe to it an attribute, and then argue back that this attribute is the outcome of ice. This is not proof, but simply arguing in a circle...\"


http://www.bartleby.com/81/3821.html


xxxOso
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  P Forgas: Cogito, ergo sum, not cognito
4 mins
  -> Thank you, P. ¶:^)

agree  Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
5 mins
  -> Thank you, Cristina ¶:^)

agree  Nikita Kobrin
6 mins
  -> Thank you, Nikita ¶:^)

agree  Susana Galilea: me parece que el colega Forgas tiene razón
8 mins
  -> Yo también, Susana. Gracias ¶:^)

agree  Martin Perazzo: Yup, y es "cogito" no "cognito"
12 mins
  -> Así es, Martin. Gracias ¶:^)

agree  Rowan Morrell
35 mins
  -> Thank you, Rowan ¶:^)

agree  zebung: no doubt
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, zebung ¶:^)

agree  Monica Colangelo
3 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, Trixie ¶:^)

agree  Fernando Muela
5 hrs
  -> Mil gracias, Fer ¶:^)

agree  Piotr Kurek
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, Piotr ¶:^)

agree  LQA Russian: cogito ergo sum
6 hrs
  -> Thank you, vdv ¶:^)

agree  Maciej Andrzejczak
7 hrs
  -> Thank you, Maciej ¶:^)

agree  Marie Scarano
7 hrs
  -> Thank you, Marie ¶:^)

agree  Joseph J. Brazauskas
9 hrs
  -> Thank you, Joseph ¶:^)

agree  Mura
12 hrs
  -> Thank you, Mura ¶:^)

agree  Antonio Camangi
17 hrs
  -> Thank you, acamangi ¶:^)

agree  Luz Dumanowsky
17 hrs
  -> Mil gracias, Virginia ¶:^)

agree  xxxcmk
33 days
  -> Muchas gracias, cmk ¶:^)
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
I learn, therefore I am


Explanation:
If it is not a misspelled Descartes' "COGITO ergo sum" it may be a play of words meaning rather: I learn, or I study, therefore I am.

(Lating) cognosco - to learn, to recognise,to study, to read.

Magda

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Note added at 2003-01-27 01:10:26 (GMT)
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PS cognito is not correct Latin, either.

Magda Dziadosz
Poland
Local time: 15:36
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
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47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
I think, therefore I am


Explanation:
"COGITO ergo sum" is the famous conclusion drawn by Descartes after a long and arduous attempt to prove his own existence. Troubled by the fact that he could only prove his experience of life through his own perceptions, he began to examine and systematically remove everything that depended on his perceptions. In the end, the only thing left that was irrefutable was the fact that he could think. Using that, he verified his existence and went on to base a whole lot of other truths on that fact. Since then, this phrase has been used throughout literature of all kinds, usually when the writer wishes to emphasize the importance of our ability to think.

(I heard that the later conclusions Descartes made weren't as sound or easy to understand as his first, though. I also heard that he went up into the mountains and locked himself in a cabin until he could prove that he existed. He apparently was a little unstable from thinking too much.)

William Clough
United States
Local time: 09:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mura
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mura!
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