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est e vilta

English translation: Where is this phrase from?

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15:07 Oct 11, 2008
Latin to English translations [PRO]
History
Latin term or phrase: est e vilta
I do not know how this term can be used and I do not know the context it would be used
Linda Howard-Bates
English translation:Where is this phrase from?
Explanation:
Hm, there is another solution (I don't mean it, of course :-), but the others are also trying to shoot a fly with a cannon in the dark), Vilta is a city in Estonia. So it can be: somebody/something is from Vilta.

Or: est è viltà "means" East is cowardice.

Without context, that means of course nothing, I didn't mean those solutions. But if there is no context: where is this stub of sentence from?
Selected response from:

Péter Jutai
Hungary
Local time: 20:54
Grading comment
Okay, Peter, thanks for your answers. I will tell you where I heard these words. I picked up a pen from the floor and thought it was a good pen to write with. It is an incredible story, and one you may not believe, but I started to write with the pen and wrote est e vilta-I am a clairvoyant medium and I believe that I have stumbled upon something. I will let you know if I get to the bottom of this. Thankyou. This is very interesting and I am inclined, or drawn, to your interpretation.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1He/she/it is from the farmhouse.Joseph J. Brazauskas
4This is not Latin, but Italian
Veronika McLaren
1 +1Where is this phrase from?Péter Jutai


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
This is not Latin, but Italian


Explanation:
A quotation from Dante's Inferno, to be exact. The question was asked in 2000 by a student who had come across the words. ProZ termsearch: Qui si convien lasciare ogni sospetto; ogni vilta convien che qui sia morta.

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Note added at 40 mins (2008-10-11 15:47:53 GMT)
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Vilta = cowardice

Veronika McLaren
Local time: 14:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Joseph J. Brazauskas: But the verb form 'est' and the preposition 'e' are certainly Latin and not Italian./Yes, we would need context for certainty, but the asker can't provide any.
12 mins
  -> Somebody mixing things up and wanting to say "it was out of cowardice?" We'd need context, wouldn't we?
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
He/she/it is from the farmhouse.


Explanation:
This is if one emends 'vilta' to 'villa'; 't' and 'l' are frequently confused in Latin palaeography and the confusions are often reproduced in printed editions.

Less likely, 'vilta' may be for 'vilica', in which case it would mean 'He/she/it is from the overseer's wife'.

Joseph J. Brazauskas
United States
Local time: 14:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Vicky. I hope that all is well with you.
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Where is this phrase from?


Explanation:
Hm, there is another solution (I don't mean it, of course :-), but the others are also trying to shoot a fly with a cannon in the dark), Vilta is a city in Estonia. So it can be: somebody/something is from Vilta.

Or: est è viltà "means" East is cowardice.

Without context, that means of course nothing, I didn't mean those solutions. But if there is no context: where is this stub of sentence from?

Péter Jutai
Hungary
Local time: 20:54
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Hungarian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Okay, Peter, thanks for your answers. I will tell you where I heard these words. I picked up a pen from the floor and thought it was a good pen to write with. It is an incredible story, and one you may not believe, but I started to write with the pen and wrote est e vilta-I am a clairvoyant medium and I believe that I have stumbled upon something. I will let you know if I get to the bottom of this. Thankyou. This is very interesting and I am inclined, or drawn, to your interpretation.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Veronika McLaren: You're right, those are all possibilities I pondered as well.
5 hrs
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (3): Joseph J. Brazauskas, Vicky Papaprodromou, Péter Jutai


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Changes made by editors
Oct 12, 2008 - Changes made by Péter Jutai:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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