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persona non grata

English translation: an unwelcome person, not wanted

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23:43 Mar 14, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: persona non grata
when would this phrase be used most often in everyday speech
Gary Fremouw
English translation:an unwelcome person, not wanted
Explanation:
Lots of contexts: If you are not invited to someone's wedding and you still show up, you are likely to be called a persona non grata. To your face or behind your back. :)

If you are ever anywhere where you are not welcome, you are deemed to be a persona non grata.

Not welcome (here) ---is the gist of the meaning.

On this forum, for example, a person who abused it or its privileges, would be a "personal non grata" (asked to leave, removed etc.)
Hope it helps.

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Note added at 2002-03-15 05:15:12 (GMT)
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persona non grata (not personal as I typed in one spot above)
Selected response from:

Lota
United States
Local time: 04:02
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6an unwelcome person, not wanted
Lota
5persona non grataAntonio Costa
5an unacceptable or unwelcome person
Daniela Miklic Belancic


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
an unwelcome person, not wanted


Explanation:
Lots of contexts: If you are not invited to someone's wedding and you still show up, you are likely to be called a persona non grata. To your face or behind your back. :)

If you are ever anywhere where you are not welcome, you are deemed to be a persona non grata.

Not welcome (here) ---is the gist of the meaning.

On this forum, for example, a person who abused it or its privileges, would be a "personal non grata" (asked to leave, removed etc.)
Hope it helps.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-15 05:15:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

persona non grata (not personal as I typed in one spot above)

Lota
United States
Local time: 04:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
1 min

agree  swisstell: and is often left untranslated
2 mins

agree  Eva Blanar: it is also used in diplomacy (a diplomat who shall leave, a politician who is not invited etc.)
13 mins

agree  Marian Greenfield: absolutely
15 mins

neutral  Elvira Stoianov: this question has already been asked today, and who knows how many times more.
1 hr
  -> why dont you just refrain from commenting if it is of no use?

agree  Chris Rowson: eli, the earlier question was for meaning, this is a reasonable question about usage.
5 hrs

agree  irat56
6 hrs
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
an unacceptable or unwelcome person


Explanation:
gratus-"pleasing"

Daniela Miklic Belancic
Local time: 13:02
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian
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4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
persona non grata


Explanation:
This expression is understood all over the word like "I love you". For everyday usage it is considered a pedantic way of say that "you are not welcome"

Antonio Costa
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