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Aboleo extium cavium du eternias

English translation: I destroy.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Aboleo
English translation:I destroy.
Entered by: David Wigtil
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21:11 May 25, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Aboleo extium cavium du eternias
Aboleo extium cavium du eternias
David
[Not Latin. Likely a pseudo-foreign phrase.]
Explanation:
This seems to be made-up "TV Latin." The only actual Latin word in your phrase is ABOLEO, meaning "I destroy."

*Speculations*:
- The word CAVIUM might be a distortion of CAVEAM, "(the/a) cave" (accusative case [object form] of CAVEA) -- perhaps, "I destroy the cave."

- The word ETERNIAS might be a distortion of AETERNITAS, "eternity" --but it is in the nominative case [feminine, subject form] without any verb for it...an incomplete one-word sentence.

- The remaining two words do not exist in Latin or as alternate inflections or spellings of anything remotely Latin. However, the word -->DU<-- could be French, "of the" (with masculine singular nouns) but being masculine it cannot work with the presumptive AETERNITAS, or it might be German, "you" (singular, familiar form, nominative case), or a word in many other languages of multiple possible meanings. The word -->EXTIUM<-- (or EXSTIUM? or AEXTIUM?) resembles nothing that I've encountered in Latin or in several other European languages (unless it represents the English letters X, T, ummmm).

This phrase comes from an episode of the television series "Charmed", which deals with witchcraft. There is no end of spells, both in English and in "foreign" languages, spilling forth from such occult inspiration.

Selected response from:

David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 02:33
Grading comment
Thanks for your help! You're a star!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2[Not Latin. Likely a pseudo-foreign phrase.]
David Wigtil


  

Answers


2 days23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
[Not Latin. Likely a pseudo-foreign phrase.]


Explanation:
This seems to be made-up "TV Latin." The only actual Latin word in your phrase is ABOLEO, meaning "I destroy."

*Speculations*:
- The word CAVIUM might be a distortion of CAVEAM, "(the/a) cave" (accusative case [object form] of CAVEA) -- perhaps, "I destroy the cave."

- The word ETERNIAS might be a distortion of AETERNITAS, "eternity" --but it is in the nominative case [feminine, subject form] without any verb for it...an incomplete one-word sentence.

- The remaining two words do not exist in Latin or as alternate inflections or spellings of anything remotely Latin. However, the word -->DU<-- could be French, "of the" (with masculine singular nouns) but being masculine it cannot work with the presumptive AETERNITAS, or it might be German, "you" (singular, familiar form, nominative case), or a word in many other languages of multiple possible meanings. The word -->EXTIUM<-- (or EXSTIUM? or AEXTIUM?) resembles nothing that I've encountered in Latin or in several other European languages (unless it represents the English letters X, T, ummmm).

This phrase comes from an episode of the television series "Charmed", which deals with witchcraft. There is no end of spells, both in English and in "foreign" languages, spilling forth from such occult inspiration.



David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 02:33
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 19
Grading comment
Thanks for your help! You're a star!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martyn Glenville-Sutherland
7 days

agree  Egmont
277 days
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