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Venite ad calicem

English translation: Come to the cup!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Venite ad calicem
English translation:Come to the cup!
Entered by: Egmont
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21:24 Jul 6, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Venite ad calicem
Religious phrase used in the Provence region of France during 15th-16th century.
Julian
Come to the cup!
Explanation:
The literal meaning is "come to the cup". If you use Google, as jerryk has done, you find his reference (my first) to the Archbishop chanting this "during the handout". I´m not sure, though, that the explanation here is complete - why would he say "come to the cup" to invite them to come and get the pastries?

And "calicem" really has a strong flavour of "chalice" rather than "cup" - so when an archbishop says this, I expect that he is calling the faithful to receive the communion wine. The cup for this is called the calix, or chalice. Only I am not sure whether it was tradition at this time for the ordinary people to receive the wine - this is often reserved only for the priests.

The translation given by the jerryk and the first reference is rather doubtful. There is no place (as far as I can discover) called Calisson, it´s just the name of the pastry. It was in Aix-de-Provence that this was said. So maybe it means "come to the (pastry) cup", and maybe it means "come to the (communion) chalice", and maybe it is a play on words meaning both.

The pastry sounds delicious, though - see my second reference.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-07 00:54:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don´t know why I am calling the calisson a pastry, it is a confection. Maybe because I am just waking up. Notice that the second reference also expresses uncertainty about the origin of the name, but talks about the contrast between the sweeteness and smoothness of the calisson and the roughness of the wine.

Anpther reference, in French, gives a different origin for the name calisson. a nice little story of René d´Anjou and his marriage to Jeanne de Laval, with no archbishop in sight. The calisson is the same almond sweet, but here there is nothing to do with \"Venite ad calicem\".
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 07:11
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4Come to the cup!Chris Rowson
4Come, ye all, to Calissonxxxjerryk


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Come, ye all, to Calisson


Explanation:
Calissons d'Aix - ProvenceBeyond
... The Archbishop of Aix chanted the Latin "Venite ad Calicem" during the handout, and
the Provencals translated this to "Venes toui i calissoun", or "Venez tous ...
http://www.beyond.fr/food/calisson.html




xxxjerryk

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Wigtil: The Provenc,als actually misunderstood the Latin, and so mistranslated (!) the Latin phrase. That is the real point of this story.
1 day15 hrs
  -> Interesting. I was wondering about that. Though, wouldn't either translation have validity in historical context?
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Come to the cup!


Explanation:
The literal meaning is "come to the cup". If you use Google, as jerryk has done, you find his reference (my first) to the Archbishop chanting this "during the handout". I´m not sure, though, that the explanation here is complete - why would he say "come to the cup" to invite them to come and get the pastries?

And "calicem" really has a strong flavour of "chalice" rather than "cup" - so when an archbishop says this, I expect that he is calling the faithful to receive the communion wine. The cup for this is called the calix, or chalice. Only I am not sure whether it was tradition at this time for the ordinary people to receive the wine - this is often reserved only for the priests.

The translation given by the jerryk and the first reference is rather doubtful. There is no place (as far as I can discover) called Calisson, it´s just the name of the pastry. It was in Aix-de-Provence that this was said. So maybe it means "come to the (pastry) cup", and maybe it means "come to the (communion) chalice", and maybe it is a play on words meaning both.

The pastry sounds delicious, though - see my second reference.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-07 00:54:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don´t know why I am calling the calisson a pastry, it is a confection. Maybe because I am just waking up. Notice that the second reference also expresses uncertainty about the origin of the name, but talks about the contrast between the sweeteness and smoothness of the calisson and the roughness of the wine.

Anpther reference, in French, gives a different origin for the name calisson. a nice little story of René d´Anjou and his marriage to Jeanne de Laval, with no archbishop in sight. The calisson is the same almond sweet, but here there is nothing to do with \"Venite ad calicem\".


    Reference: http://www.beyond.fr/food/calisson.html
    Reference: http://www.provencelive.com/provence/tradition2.html
Chris Rowson
Local time: 07:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 49
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Wigtil: "Come to the cup", the correct translation, is a religious phrase that makes sense only in the Mass. The story about the Aix townsfolk clearly is intended to show how they failed to understand the Latin!
1 day12 hrs

agree  xxxjerryk: Yes. I wasn't thorough enough in my research. Although, I think the mistranslation does have historical relevance.
1 day14 hrs

agree  Simon Charass: You are right. The story of the Calisson, what ever may be, is funny and may have some relevance in the local tradition. Let’s not forget that the Mass was said in Latin, the church was big, the priest far away and “les commeres jassaient”.
3 days2 hrs

agree  xxxcmk
237 days
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