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Homerus luculentissimo carmine palam fecit

English translation: Homer made public in a most distinguished poem

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Homerus luculentissimo carmine palam fecit
English translation:Homer made public in a most distinguished poem
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas
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13:33 Apr 7, 2008
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other / Latin quote in Anglo-Saxon dictionary
Latin term or phrase: Homerus luculentissimo carmine palam fecit
Hi,

Please see:
http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/html/oe_bosworthtoller/b0951.html

I'm not too sure about the grammar of this one. If palam goes with luculentissimo carmine, “fecit” seems a bit weak – Homer made in the presence of the most brilliant poetry? Made what?

Homerus luculentissimo carmine palam fecit

All the best, and many thanks,

Simon
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:08
Homer made public in a most distinguished poem
Explanation:
Since it glosses the Old English 'Omarus sweotelícost sægde' = 'Homer said most manifestly', I take the ablative here as locative and 'palam' as going with 'fecit'.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
many thanks excellent as ever
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Homer proclaimed with most splendid songJennifer Ottman
4Homer made public in a most distinguished poem
Joseph Brazauskas


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Homer proclaimed with most splendid song


Explanation:
This quotation is not the complete original sentence, just the part that corresponds to the Anglo-Saxon phrase preceding it in the dictionary entry. `Palam' should not be taken with `luculentissimo carmine', but with `fecit', giving literally something like `made public', `made plain'. What is being proclaimed or made public is who fought in the Trojan War.
See the full sentence at the link below (scroll down to c. 17).


    Reference: http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/orosius/orosius1.shtml
Jennifer Ottman
United States
Local time: 13:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas
10 mins
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Homer made public in a most distinguished poem


Explanation:
Since it glosses the Old English 'Omarus sweotelícost sægde' = 'Homer said most manifestly', I take the ablative here as locative and 'palam' as going with 'fecit'.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 31
Grading comment
many thanks excellent as ever
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Voters for reclassification
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PRO (1): Krisztina Lelik


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Changes made by editors
Apr 9, 2008 - Changes made by Joseph Brazauskas:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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