KudoZ home » Latin to English » Other

VIR OMNIUM FEMINARUM ET FEMINA OMNIUM VIRORUM...

English translation: A man for every woman and a woman for evey man

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:VIR OMNIUM FEMINARUM ET FEMINA OMNIUM VIRORUM...
English translation:A man for every woman and a woman for evey man
Entered by: Adam Bartley
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:09 Aug 19, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: VIR OMNIUM FEMINARUM ET FEMINA OMNIUM VIRORUM...
Just the phrase. I can't understand what it means. I am leaning towards "A Man of all kinds is a woman and a woman of any kind is a Man..." but I am not sure.
John Pappas
A man for every woman and a woman for evey man
Explanation:
This phrase was used to describe Julius Caesar. Although it sounds like the sort of thing that Catullus would say I'm pretty sure it comes from Suetonius' Lives of the Twelve Caesars (sadly I'm not on my own computer at the moment, or I would check it through Phi). Caesar was famous for his avant-garde behaviour, compare poem 57 by Catullus, the opening of which I have seen well translated as 'Caesar and Mamurrus - a brazen pair of buggers'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-19 11:19:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'ve found it. It comes from Suetonius\' Life of Julius Caesar chapter 52 (LII). Suetonius attributes the sentiment to Curio.

Adam
Selected response from:

Adam Bartley
Australia
Local time: 20:19
Grading comment
Well... am I immpressed or what? Thank you very much for your help. I need to take yet another latin course I guess... Your answer was perfect.

Take Care

John.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +6A man for every woman and a woman for evey manAdam Bartley
5A man of all the women and a woman of all the men
flaviofbg
4Man for/to all the women and woman for/to all men
Squi


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
A man of all the women and a woman of all the men


Explanation:
Uhm... this is what I see. Quite odd!
Where did you find it? :)

Vir: Man (nominative)
Omnium Feminarum: of all the women (it is a genitive plural)

et: and (not "is", that would be "est")

femina: Woman (nominative)
omnium virorum: of all the men (genitive plural again

I hope this makes sense... it is so strange ;)

Flavio


    Distinction in Latin
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 12:19
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 155
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Man for/to all the women and woman for/to all men


Explanation:
The idea might be either
1. Two persons are described, both very popular with the other sex;
2. Someone like Caligula is described, bisexual, unsatiable person serving as a female to all men wanting him and as a male to all women he wants...

I am guessing, but grammatically it means something like the above adduced suggestion


Squi
Denmark
Local time: 12:19
Native speaker of: Russian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
A man for every woman and a woman for evey man


Explanation:
This phrase was used to describe Julius Caesar. Although it sounds like the sort of thing that Catullus would say I'm pretty sure it comes from Suetonius' Lives of the Twelve Caesars (sadly I'm not on my own computer at the moment, or I would check it through Phi). Caesar was famous for his avant-garde behaviour, compare poem 57 by Catullus, the opening of which I have seen well translated as 'Caesar and Mamurrus - a brazen pair of buggers'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-19 11:19:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I\'ve found it. It comes from Suetonius\' Life of Julius Caesar chapter 52 (LII). Suetonius attributes the sentiment to Curio.

Adam

Adam Bartley
Australia
Local time: 20:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Well... am I immpressed or what? Thank you very much for your help. I need to take yet another latin course I guess... Your answer was perfect.

Take Care

John.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Squi: Quite! After I have replied, I got a strange feeling of "déjà vu", now you have solved this mystery!
9 mins
  -> It's really one of those phrases that sticks, isn't it? Suetonius is full of 'em.

agree  Libero_Lang_Lab
23 mins

agree  Chris Rowson
4 hrs

agree  John Kinory
11 hrs

agree  flaviofbg: Congrats Adam ;)
20 hrs

agree  xxxcmk
194 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search