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Animalus

English translation: animate, having a soul

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Animalus
English translation:animate, having a soul
Entered by: Elenacb
Options:
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17:18 May 25, 2003
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Animalus
Animalus is a Latin word used bythe Ancient Romans which means having breath. what is the modern word?
animate
Explanation:
?
Selected response from:

Elenacb
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:52
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4made of air/living
Joseph Brazauskas
4 +3animate; having a soul; with soul/spiritxxxVera Fluhr
5 +2If it is "Animalis"
Claudio Nasso
2 +5animals
Kirill Semenov
2 +5animate
Elenacb


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +5
animate


Explanation:
?

Elenacb
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:52
Native speaker of: Native in SlovakSlovak
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxVera Fluhr: YES! It is an adjective, that's the point! Please see below.
54 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: That is one sense, yes.
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  Georgios Paraskevopoulos
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  xxxIno66
4 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Сергей Лузан
33 days
  -> Thanks!
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +5
animals


Explanation:
The word Animal comes from the Latin work animalus, which means, “having a soul” and is closely linked to the word animus or breath. The dictionary describes soul as the animating force in humans and animals, an entity distinct from the body and related to the spirit, implying and eternal quality.



St. Augustine's influence, and later St. Thomas Aquinas's similar views, turned this perception of animalus domesticus into the accepted Christian ethic. In contrast to Native and eastern philosophies, which saw animals as having souls and therefore as being part of these philosophies' sphere of ethical concerns, western thought excluded animals from our legal and moral systems until the nineteenth century. Nevertheless, strong biblical injunctions fostered a common social consensus forbidding wanton cruelty to animals. Granted, there were exceptions, such as the time when Christ sent the Gadarene Demons into a herd of swine (which promptly lunged off a cliff) and when Queen Elizabeth I burned an effigy of the pope stuffed with live cats.

"animalus domesticus" are obviously "domestic animals"



    www.hjcentral.com/information/Newsletters/ Ttouch/SEPTNEWS.doc
    Reference: http://gvanv.com/compass/arch/v1403/baltaz.html
Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 11:52
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 169

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxVera Fluhr: Sorry, Kirill, I have not noticed that you have already quoted the site www.hjcentral.com/
29 mins
  -> it's ok, thank you very much :)

agree  Georgios Paraskevopoulos
54 mins
  -> thank you :)

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: The spelling of the masculine and feminine form is 'animalis', and 'animus', though closely connected with 'anima', means 'mind, (rational, not vital) soul, intention, thought, etc.', never 'breath'.
1 hr
  -> true, my guess was this is a hybrid of "animalis" & "animus", but I was not sure, so I've searched Google and found... well, what I've found :)

agree  xxxIno66
3 hrs
  -> thank you :)

agree  Сергей Лузан
33 days
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
If it is "Animalis"


Explanation:
Breath / Life / Soul

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Note added at 2003-05-25 17:49:14 (GMT)
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Cfr. Luigi Castiglioni, Scevola Mariotti: \"Vocabolario della Lingua Latina\", Latino-Italiano / Italiano Latino, Loescher, Torino

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-25 18:50:20 (GMT)
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Cfr. Luigi Castiglioni, Scevola Mariotti: \"Vocabolario della Lingua Latina\", Latino-Italiano / Italiano Latino, Loescher, Torino (sorry, in Italian): animalis, e agg. (adj) 1) composto di aria ... 2) animato, vivente ... sost. (noun) animalis, is m. e f. animale ... Apuleio \"ex animali et inanimali\"

Claudio Nasso
Italy
Local time: 10:52
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxVera Fluhr: "Animalis" is a noun, while "animalus" is an adjective. That's the difference.
36 mins
  -> "Animalis" is also an adjective. I have never found "animalus" in Latin

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: 'Animal' is the noun, 'animalis' the adjective.
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Joseph

agree  xxxIno66
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ino
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
animate; having a soul; with soul/spirit


Explanation:
The word Animal comes from the Latin work animalus, which means, having a soul ...
http://www.hjcentral.com/information/Newsletters/ Ttouch/SEPTNEWS.doc

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-25 18:11:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Animalus\" is sometime interpreted as \"spirit\" itself.

It can also have a physical frame, i.e.:

... Fifaldae animalus, 15, 1 3,s. [Cf. ... 135, 25- (6) the human frame, the corporeal part of man in contrast with soul or spirit:-http://penguin.pearson.swarthmore.edu/~scrist1/scanned_books...

Other samples (sorry, in French):

J\'entends déjà les commentaires de notre animalus national, mais c\'est comme ça. ...
http://www.cercle-solvay.be/caducee/Caducee Bal2001.pdf

... Selon GUILLAUME VIVIER l’homme cet animalus metaphysicus a toujours une idée ...
http://plombier95.nerim.net/vivierG.ht



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Note added at 2003-05-25 18:18:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

THE DIFFERENCE between the words \"ANIMALUS\" and \"ANIMALIS\":

ANIMALIS - is a noun.

ANIMALUS is an adjective which sometimes is also used in phrases as a noun.


    www.hjcentral.com/information/Newsletters/ Ttouch/SEPTNEWS.doc
xxxVera Fluhr
Local time: 10:52
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas: This is one possible meaning.
51 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  xxxIno66
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Сергей Лузан: The most generic.
33 days
  -> Thanks
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
made of air/living


Explanation:
There is no Latin word 'animalus' at any stage of the language, as far as I know, so I'm presuming that the word which you're quoting is 'animalis'.

'Animalis' is an adjective formed from the noun 'anima', which means 'wind, breath, soul'. The soul was conceived of by the Romans, as by many ancient peoples, as composed of an airy substance, akin to breath. The adjective therefore means properly 'composed of air, airy', and by extension 'living, alive'.

'Animal' is simply a neuter form of this adjective (the nominative neuter termination -e being dropped when adjectives of this class are used substantively), and means 'a living (breathing) being', i.e., an animal.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 432

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claudio Nasso: Thank you Joseph.
4 mins
  -> You're welcome.

agree  xxxIno66
3 hrs
  -> Benigne facis, ut soles.

agree  Eva Blanar
2 days22 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Сергей Лузан
33 days
  -> Many thanks.
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