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legati propraetore

English translation: (deputy) provincial governor/commissioner/military adviser

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:legati propraetore
English translation:(deputy) provincial governor/commissioner/military adviser
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas
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12:23 May 28, 2003
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: legati propraetore
...it opened the way for the more outstanding and experienced to become legati propraetore of imperial provinces...
Ashiyana Begum
(deputy) provincial governor/commissioner/military adviser
Explanation:
In the early Republic, two praetors (> 'praeire', 'to go before') served as the annually elected heads of the Roman state. About the end of the 4th cent. BCE, they were replaced by new magistrates called consuls, and their duties restricted mostly to the administration of justice. From the late 3rd cent. BCE, praetors were frequently nominated by the Senate as governors of the Roman provinces which were growing in number too rapidly to be administered by the two consuls.

During the late Republic, 'legati' (>'legare', 'to appoint to a task, delegate'), who were normally of senatorial rank, served on a provincial governor's staff, often as commanders of a legion or cohort.

'Pro praetore' means 'in place of a praetor (governor), on a governor's behalf', and a 'legatus pro praetore' originally meant 'a deputy (acting) in place of a governor'.

But under the Empire matters changed somewhat. Every province had one or more legions stationed within it. In those provinces where there was only one legion, its commander, now styled 'legatus Augusti pro praetore', was also the provincial governor. Egypt, which was governed by 'praefecti legionum', 'prefects of legions', who were of equestrian rank, and Africa, which was administered by a proconsul until Caligula's reign, were the only exceptions.

'Legati Augusti pro praetore' were also employed by the Emperor on special commissions, civil, judicial, or military, and especially as his military advisers in the field.

The translation, therefore, depends on the date of the text in which it occurs. If it was written before Augustus' reign (27 BCE-14 CE), it will mean 'deputy provincial governor'; if after, simply 'provincial governor', or occasionally 'commissioner, military adviser'.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
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Summary of answers provided
5 +2(deputy) provincial governor/commissioner/military adviser
Joseph Brazauskas
4Legatus Propraetore
Beatrice T


  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Legatus Propraetore


Explanation:
(not legati, but legatus!)
I think it should stay as is, but if you want to translate it (maybe in brackets), then it should sound like "Governor"
Bye!



    Reference: http://www.jmiller.demon.co.uk/roma3.htm
    www.earth-history.com/Ancient-texts/ Roman/Roman-main.htm
Beatrice T
Italy
Local time: 19:01
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
(deputy) provincial governor/commissioner/military adviser


Explanation:
In the early Republic, two praetors (> 'praeire', 'to go before') served as the annually elected heads of the Roman state. About the end of the 4th cent. BCE, they were replaced by new magistrates called consuls, and their duties restricted mostly to the administration of justice. From the late 3rd cent. BCE, praetors were frequently nominated by the Senate as governors of the Roman provinces which were growing in number too rapidly to be administered by the two consuls.

During the late Republic, 'legati' (>'legare', 'to appoint to a task, delegate'), who were normally of senatorial rank, served on a provincial governor's staff, often as commanders of a legion or cohort.

'Pro praetore' means 'in place of a praetor (governor), on a governor's behalf', and a 'legatus pro praetore' originally meant 'a deputy (acting) in place of a governor'.

But under the Empire matters changed somewhat. Every province had one or more legions stationed within it. In those provinces where there was only one legion, its commander, now styled 'legatus Augusti pro praetore', was also the provincial governor. Egypt, which was governed by 'praefecti legionum', 'prefects of legions', who were of equestrian rank, and Africa, which was administered by a proconsul until Caligula's reign, were the only exceptions.

'Legati Augusti pro praetore' were also employed by the Emperor on special commissions, civil, judicial, or military, and especially as his military advisers in the field.

The translation, therefore, depends on the date of the text in which it occurs. If it was written before Augustus' reign (27 BCE-14 CE), it will mean 'deputy provincial governor'; if after, simply 'provincial governor', or occasionally 'commissioner, military adviser'.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 432
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Blanar
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Eva.

agree  Сергей Лузан
30 days
  -> Thanks.
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