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excontrario

English translation: arguement derived from the contrary.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:argumentum au/e-contrario
English translation:arguement derived from the contrary.
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17:39 Aug 9, 2002
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Philosophy / philosophy
Latin term or phrase: excontrario
i think the term is latin....used argumentatively as in
"argumentum excontrario"
joyonto537
Local time: 05:09
Argument from the contrary
Explanation:
It is indeed Latin, and a term well-known in philosophy and law, dating back to Cicero, although the correct form is "argumentum a contrario".

It means exactly what what it looks like, there are no false friends here. The interpretation as "proof ..." is common, but I see no reason for it. This is one of the eight principal types of argument for the truth of something; another is the "argumentum ex silentio", which no-one translates as "proof", it is always the "argument from silence". See reference.

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Note added at 2002-08-10 10:41:00 (GMT)
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And it is in the end, no proof. Actually, these arguments are sometimes referred to as the \"material fallacies\", because they are brought forward as if they were proof, but are not.
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 01:39
Grading comment
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Argument from the contraryChris Rowson
4 +2proof from the contrary
leff
5not an answer
luskie


  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
proof from the contrary


Explanation:
argumentum ex contrario (L): proof from the contrary



    Reference: http://www.ai-studio.com/joshwood/lexintro.html
leff
Local time: 01:39
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  luskie: and never saw one without the hyphen...
57 mins

agree  David Wigtil: Note: As "leff" has written, the Latin phrase is *two* words: "ex contrario."
2 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
not an answer


Explanation:
erratum: sorry, I meant to point out that I've never seen one without the separation of the two words...

(thanks to Loquamur :)

luskie
Local time: 01:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Argument from the contrary


Explanation:
It is indeed Latin, and a term well-known in philosophy and law, dating back to Cicero, although the correct form is "argumentum a contrario".

It means exactly what what it looks like, there are no false friends here. The interpretation as "proof ..." is common, but I see no reason for it. This is one of the eight principal types of argument for the truth of something; another is the "argumentum ex silentio", which no-one translates as "proof", it is always the "argument from silence". See reference.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-10 10:41:00 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And it is in the end, no proof. Actually, these arguments are sometimes referred to as the \"material fallacies\", because they are brought forward as if they were proof, but are not.


    Reference: http://www.liv.ac.uk/Philosophy/humanities.html
Chris Rowson
Local time: 01:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  luskie: sounds more than right, indeed
2 hrs

agree  Egmont
94 days
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