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ILLEGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM

English translation: don't let the bastards grind/get you down

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:ILLEGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM
English translation:don't let the bastards grind/get you down
Entered by: Sheila Hardie
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:30 Dec 7, 2001
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Latin term or phrase: ILLEGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM
QUOTE SEEN IN ARTICLE, ARTICLE STATES THAT IT MEANS "DON'T LET THE BASTARDS WEAR YOU DOWN" LOVE THE QUOTE, JUST DOUBLECHECKING BEFORE I PASS IT ON
ERIN WEDEMEYER
don't let the bastards grind/get you down
Explanation:
I answered a similar question on ProZ some time ago. Here is my answer. I hope this helps you.

Sheila



http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&eid_c=22228&id=102775


Don't let the bastards grind/get you down.
Quotation from Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.

Hope this helps!
Sheila


 Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.

  It’s a line from The Handmaid’s Tale.  It means “Don’t let the bastards get you down.”  These are important words to remember at such a critical time in the progressive movement’s history. 

http://hel-raiser.tripod.com/columns/butseriously1214.html


the phrase "nolite te bastardes carborundorum" and
it's meaning. It is pseudo latin and a more frequently used version is
"illegitimus non carborundum"...meaning "don't let the bastards grind
you down". Carborundum referring to grinding. This comes from my latin
scholar, once a priest husband, so it's probably as legit as the pseudo
latin phrase is.

http://books.rpmdp.com/archives/v01.n1624
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 01:23
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2don't let the bastards grind/get you down
Sheila Hardie
4don't let the bastards grind/get you down
Sheila Hardie
4Here is additional information on the origin of the phrase:Fuad Yahya


  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Here is additional information on the origin of the phrase:


Explanation:
This excerpt is from this web page:

http://www.ukans.edu/history/index/europe/ancient_rome/E/Gaz...

"phrase of Roman law, Dig. 19 tit.2 s.13, referring to the legal doctrine whereby illegitimate children could not avail themselves of the right, granted under Theodosius and later emperors, to free medical care for gum disease and tooth loss incurred as a consequence of grit in flour from the imperial mills distributed by the praefectus annonae.
For grit in flour, due mostly to relatively soft sandstone mill-stones, its health consequences in antiquity, and the resulting wear on teeth useful in forensic dating of human remains, see Bakker's monumental work, Sandsteinschotterzahnverfall in Alterthums, Leipzig, 1847; for the theory of state responsibility in epidemic disease spread by food welfare schemes, see J.-D. Puceau de la Gencivière, Observations juridiques inédites sur une ode de Tertullien: les maladies endémiques de l'antiquité tardive, Louvain, 1922, esp. pp.143-152 and his bibliography.
The exclusion of illegitimates from what had been felt to be a matter of imperial responsibility first occurred in a rescript of Justin II. Although phrased in terms of Christian morality, the rescript was in fact suggested by court administrative officers seeking to tighten the imperial finances. What started with teeth and the illegitimate soon was opportunistically extended under subsequent emperors, however, to almost every government subsidy, and this intransigent attitude eventually led to the so-called Carborundum or Teeth Riots under Heraclius in 619.
The matter was resolved by a military expedition in which a small Byzantine army led by Odontophanes, himself illegitimate, broke the ivory monopoly of the Abyssinians and established a state factory of false teeth at Pyopolis on the coast of the Indian Ocean in 623; predictably, this became a major factor in the decline in elephant populations in East Africa. At Bullahar in Somalia, K.A. Johnston and a team of co-workers from the American University of Beirut found ancient remains in 1968 which have been tentatively identified as Pyopolis (J. Irrepr. Res., liv.24-27, 1971)."



    Reference: http://www.ukans.edu/history/index/europe/ancient_rome/E/Gaz...
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
don't let the bastards grind/get you down


Explanation:
I answered a similar question on ProZ some time ago. Here is my answer. I hope this helps you.

Sheila



http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&eid_c=22228&id=102775


Don't let the bastards grind/get you down.
Quotation from Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.

Hope this helps!
Sheila


 Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.

  It’s a line from The Handmaid’s Tale.  It means “Don’t let the bastards get you down.”  These are important words to remember at such a critical time in the progressive movement’s history. 

http://hel-raiser.tripod.com/columns/butseriously1214.html


the phrase "nolite te bastardes carborundorum" and
it's meaning. It is pseudo latin and a more frequently used version is
"illegitimus non carborundum"...meaning "don't let the bastards grind
you down". Carborundum referring to grinding. This comes from my latin
scholar, once a priest husband, so it's probably as legit as the pseudo
latin phrase is.

http://books.rpmdp.com/archives/v01.n1624

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 01:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  athena22: Yes, this phrase does keep popping up. Nice information from Fuad, too.
2 hrs
  -> yes, it's an interesting story, isn't it:)

agree  DR. RICHARD BAVRY
13 hrs
  -> thanks, Richard:)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
don't let the bastards grind/get you down


Explanation:
I answered a similar question on ProZ some time ago. Here is my answer. I hope this helps you.

Sheila



http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&eid_c=22228&id=102775


Don't let the bastards grind/get you down.
Quotation from Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale.

Hope this helps!
Sheila


 Nolite te bastardes carborundorum.

  It’s a line from The Handmaid’s Tale.  It means “Don’t let the bastards get you down.”  These are important words to remember at such a critical time in the progressive movement’s history. 

http://hel-raiser.tripod.com/columns/butseriously1214.html


the phrase "nolite te bastardes carborundorum" and
it's meaning. It is pseudo latin and a more frequently used version is
"illegitimus non carborundum"...meaning "don't let the bastards grind
you down". Carborundum referring to grinding. This comes from my latin
scholar, once a priest husband, so it's probably as legit as the pseudo
latin phrase is.

http://books.rpmdp.com/archives/v01.n1624

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 01:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Feb 3, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO
Feb 3, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
FieldOther » Art/Literary
Field (specific)(none) » Poetry & Literature


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