KudoZ home » Latin to English » Poetry & Literature

foliis stillantia mella decusserit

English translation: took away the honey flowing from the leaves

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
09:15 Oct 25, 2007
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Source NK
Latin term or phrase: foliis stillantia mella decusserit
Hi,

I think it's a kind of idiom, but regret to say I have very little context.

Hinc est quod Saturnius olim foliis stillantia mella decusserit.

Many thanks

Simon
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:10
English translation:took away the honey flowing from the leaves
Explanation:
I'm passing through Italian to reach English, which is not my mother tongue (and, moreover, I've just a beginner's Latin to Italian dictionary here), so please use this just as a starting point...

Anyway:

Hinc = hence (more or less)
est = it is
quod = what
Saturnius is a God - the king of the Golden Age, I think (or was it the Silver one? I can't remember)
The rest I happened to find on my dictionary, and just made a rough translation from Italian into English.

BTW, it is not a verse but an excerpt from "The Georgics" - and I *seem to remember* that the author is referring to the end of the Golden (or Silver?) Age, when the God took away some of the gifts that made human life easy and sweet, forcing men to begin a life of labour and hard work.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-10-25 10:44:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By "I happened to find on my dictionary" I meant that I found the whole sentence you posted - "foliis stillantia mella decusserit" - as an exemple of the use of the verb "decutio" (shake)
Selected response from:

Alfredo Tutino
Local time: 10:10
Grading comment
many thanks excellent
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +1will have shaken the dripping honey from the leavesjanice parker
3took away the honey flowing from the leavesAlfredo Tutino
1constant dripping wears away the stonePatricia Townshend


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
constant dripping wears away the stone


Explanation:
Haven't done latin for 30 years, so this is a guess. Follis is a leather bag, stillantia is something to do with dripping, mella is a groove. Perhaps it literally says something like dripping from a leather waterbag carves a groove.

Patricia Townshend
South Africa
Local time: 10:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alfredo Tutino: see my answer - foliis is ablative (plural) of folium (leaf), mella is honey (in fact, hoeny diluted with water), decusserit is the past perfect of decutio, shake (away)... I still have a Latin-Italian dictionary... :-)
38 mins
  -> Well done! My dictionary was too small. But thanks.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
took away the honey flowing from the leaves


Explanation:
I'm passing through Italian to reach English, which is not my mother tongue (and, moreover, I've just a beginner's Latin to Italian dictionary here), so please use this just as a starting point...

Anyway:

Hinc = hence (more or less)
est = it is
quod = what
Saturnius is a God - the king of the Golden Age, I think (or was it the Silver one? I can't remember)
The rest I happened to find on my dictionary, and just made a rough translation from Italian into English.

BTW, it is not a verse but an excerpt from "The Georgics" - and I *seem to remember* that the author is referring to the end of the Golden (or Silver?) Age, when the God took away some of the gifts that made human life easy and sweet, forcing men to begin a life of labour and hard work.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-10-25 10:44:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By "I happened to find on my dictionary" I meant that I found the whole sentence you posted - "foliis stillantia mella decusserit" - as an exemple of the use of the verb "decutio" (shake)

Alfredo Tutino
Local time: 10:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
many thanks excellent
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
will have shaken the dripping honey from the leaves


Explanation:
Just putting my oar in - too late, I know, but I was intrigued by this. Virgil Georgics I line 131 has only 'mellaque decussit foliis' so I am wondering where your phrase comes from? 'decusserit' is actually 3rd person singular of future perfect of 'decutio'.

janice parker
Local time: 09:10
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas
7 days
  -> Thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Oct 25, 2007 - Changes made by Steffen Walter:
FieldOther » Art/Literary
Oct 25, 2007 - Changes made by Marie-Hélène Hayles:
Language pairEnglish » Latin to English


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search