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Insanire putas sollemnia me neque rides

English translation: You think I suffer a common madness, and you don't laugh

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Insanire putas sollemnia me neque rides
English translation:You think I suffer a common madness, and you don't laugh
Entered by: Luis Antonio de Larrauri
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10:45 Feb 17, 2009
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Horace
Latin term or phrase: Insanire putas sollemnia me neque rides
Hi,

Please see
http://www.uah.edu/society/texts/latin/classical/horace/epis...

"Insanire putas sollemnia me neque rides..."

Best wishes,

Simon
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:28
You think I suffer a common madness, and you don't laugh
Explanation:
This is the sense of sollemnia here.
"Ordinary" would do, too.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2009-02-17 11:34:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is some explanation I found on the Internet:

101. insanire sollemnia me, 'that my madness is but the
■universal one', an accusative of extent,

http://www.archive.org/stream/qhoratiflacciepi00hora/qhorati...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-17 11:49:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

101. sollemnia, as the Schol. ex-
plains it, ' pro consuetudine cunctorum,'
one more madman in a mad world ; the
doctrine of Sat. 2. 3. For the use of
' sollemnis' cp. Epp. 1. 18. 49, 2. 1. 103;
for the cogn. acc. with ' insanire ' see
Sat. 2. 3. 63.
http://www.archive.org/stream/operaomniawithco02horauoft/ope...

Here there is another translation:
si curatus inaequali tonsore capillos occurri, rides; si forte subucula pexae trita subest tunicae vel si toga dissidet impar, rides: quid mea cum pugnat sententia secum, quod petiit spernit, repetit quod nuper omisit, aestuat et vitae disconvenit ordine toto, diruit aedificat, mutat quadrata rotundis? insanire putas sollemnia me neque rides, nec medici credis nee curatoris egere a praetore dati, rerum tutela mearum cum sis et prave sectum stomacheris ob unguem de te pendentis, te respicientis amici. Ad summam, sapiens uno minor est love, dives, liber, honoratus, pulcher, rex denique regum, praecipue sanus-nisi cum pituita molesta est. If I run into you when my hair is cut unevenly, you laugh; if it happens that the shirt under my brand-new tunic is worn-out, or if my toga, ill-fitting, sits askew, you laugh: what about when my thought is at war with itself, rejects what it sought, seeks again what it just now abandoned, seethes and is out of sync with the entire system of life, when it destroys, builds, changes squares to circles? You think that I rage my usual fits and you neither laugh at me nor think that I'm in need of a doctor or guardian appointed by the praetor, though you are the caretaker of my affairs and get angry over a crookedly cut nail on the friend who depends on you, who looks to you for all. In sum, the wise man is second to Jove alone-he is rich, free, honored, handsome, finally a king of kings, and, particularly, healthy, except when he has a runny nose. (1.1.94–108)
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:_YFd9FDzvZIJ:www.eschol...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-17 11:59:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nevertheless, I think "me" is not "at me", in this case, although it might be. I think "me" is the subject in accusative of "insanire", because
1) the sentence is just following the order of previous affirmative sentences: si curatus inaequali tonsore capillos occurri, rides; si forte subucula pexae trita subest tunicae vel si toga dissidet impar, rides
2) The verb "puto" usually has a subordinate phrase with the subject in accusative when it means "regard, judge": aliquis forsan me putet... (Cicero);
putare deos esse (Cic.)
noli putare me maluisse (don't think I would have prefer..."
Selected response from:

Luis Antonio de Larrauri
Local time: 02:28
Grading comment
many thanks excellent
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4You think I suffer a common madness, and you don't laugh
Luis Antonio de Larrauri
4 +2see explanation
Sandra Mouton
4 +1You think I do slightly crazy things and you don't laugh at mePéter Jutai


  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
see explanation


Explanation:
I have found this online translation which seems sound enough.


    Reference: http://www.tonykline.co.uk/PITBR/Latin/HoraceEpistlesBkIEpI....
Sandra Mouton
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sergey Kudryashov
3 mins
  -> Спасибо Сергей

agree  Nina Storey
6 mins
  -> Thanks Nina
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
You think I suffer a common madness, and you don't laugh


Explanation:
This is the sense of sollemnia here.
"Ordinary" would do, too.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2009-02-17 11:34:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here is some explanation I found on the Internet:

101. insanire sollemnia me, 'that my madness is but the
■universal one', an accusative of extent,

http://www.archive.org/stream/qhoratiflacciepi00hora/qhorati...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-17 11:49:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

101. sollemnia, as the Schol. ex-
plains it, ' pro consuetudine cunctorum,'
one more madman in a mad world ; the
doctrine of Sat. 2. 3. For the use of
' sollemnis' cp. Epp. 1. 18. 49, 2. 1. 103;
for the cogn. acc. with ' insanire ' see
Sat. 2. 3. 63.
http://www.archive.org/stream/operaomniawithco02horauoft/ope...

Here there is another translation:
si curatus inaequali tonsore capillos occurri, rides; si forte subucula pexae trita subest tunicae vel si toga dissidet impar, rides: quid mea cum pugnat sententia secum, quod petiit spernit, repetit quod nuper omisit, aestuat et vitae disconvenit ordine toto, diruit aedificat, mutat quadrata rotundis? insanire putas sollemnia me neque rides, nec medici credis nee curatoris egere a praetore dati, rerum tutela mearum cum sis et prave sectum stomacheris ob unguem de te pendentis, te respicientis amici. Ad summam, sapiens uno minor est love, dives, liber, honoratus, pulcher, rex denique regum, praecipue sanus-nisi cum pituita molesta est. If I run into you when my hair is cut unevenly, you laugh; if it happens that the shirt under my brand-new tunic is worn-out, or if my toga, ill-fitting, sits askew, you laugh: what about when my thought is at war with itself, rejects what it sought, seeks again what it just now abandoned, seethes and is out of sync with the entire system of life, when it destroys, builds, changes squares to circles? You think that I rage my usual fits and you neither laugh at me nor think that I'm in need of a doctor or guardian appointed by the praetor, though you are the caretaker of my affairs and get angry over a crookedly cut nail on the friend who depends on you, who looks to you for all. In sum, the wise man is second to Jove alone-he is rich, free, honored, handsome, finally a king of kings, and, particularly, healthy, except when he has a runny nose. (1.1.94–108)
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:_YFd9FDzvZIJ:www.eschol...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-17 11:59:33 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nevertheless, I think "me" is not "at me", in this case, although it might be. I think "me" is the subject in accusative of "insanire", because
1) the sentence is just following the order of previous affirmative sentences: si curatus inaequali tonsore capillos occurri, rides; si forte subucula pexae trita subest tunicae vel si toga dissidet impar, rides
2) The verb "puto" usually has a subordinate phrase with the subject in accusative when it means "regard, judge": aliquis forsan me putet... (Cicero);
putare deos esse (Cic.)
noli putare me maluisse (don't think I would have prefer..."

Luis Antonio de Larrauri
Local time: 02:28
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
many thanks excellent

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Péter Jutai
8 mins
  -> Thank you, Péter!

agree  Sergey Kudryashov
34 mins
  -> Thank you, Sergey!

agree  Sandra Mouton: Agree about "me" being the subject of the infinitive
1 hr
  -> Thank you Sandra!

agree  Rebecca Garber
1 hr
  -> Thank you Rebecca!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
You think I do slightly crazy things and you don't laugh at me


Explanation:
hi,

sollemnia insanire means "to do simple, ordinary crazy things", or, as Freddy Mercury said: to go slightly mad :-)

Here is an explanation in Latin:

Nolunt videlicet solita peccare, aut ut Horatius loquitur sollemnia insanire, quibus peccandi praemium est infamia: Faciuntque hoc homines, ut ait Cicero, quos in summā nequitiā non solum libido et voluptas verum etiam ipsius nequitiae fama delectat, ut multis in locis notas ac vestigia scelerum suorum relinqui velint.

I hope this helps.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 óra (2009-02-17 13:57:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dear Antonio,

me is of course a part of the acc. cum. inf. Putas me insanire. I thought it was nicer this way.

Péter Jutai
Hungary
Local time: 02:28
Native speaker of: Hungarian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sergey Kudryashov
27 mins
  -> thx
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Feb 19, 2009 - Changes made by Luis Antonio de Larrauri:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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