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se iusto examine coram nobis habito

English translation: (after/with/in/for) having passed/taken the due/expected examination with us/in our school/college

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00:29 Mar 11, 2007
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc.
Latin term or phrase: se iusto examine coram nobis habito
parenthetic text in a book on men's school

It is written as "coraam" but I am certain it should be "coram"
Lota
United States
Local time: 14:15
English translation:(after/with/in/for) having passed/taken the due/expected examination with us/in our school/college
Explanation:
Without further context I cannot be more precise on the exact meaning of the words, but that's the overall meaning of the sentence.
Lieterally it means: "having the due examination been taken by him", where "se" (him) refers to the subject of the main clause, probably the student/scholar whom a title/diploma was granted to after his taking/passing the aforementioned exam.
Selected response from:

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro
Local time: 23:15
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5(after/with/in/for) having passed/taken the due/expected examination with us/in our school/collegeLeonardo Marcello Pignataro


  

Answers


7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
(after/with/in/for) having passed/taken the due/expected examination with us/in our school/college


Explanation:
Without further context I cannot be more precise on the exact meaning of the words, but that's the overall meaning of the sentence.
Lieterally it means: "having the due examination been taken by him", where "se" (him) refers to the subject of the main clause, probably the student/scholar whom a title/diploma was granted to after his taking/passing the aforementioned exam.

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro
Local time: 23:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Olga Cartlidge: Indeed, Senatum / comitia habere etc is common, but the sentence is in parenthesis and should make sense as a complete statement. // E.g. If, whilst due consideration is being given (Abl Temporis) / by way of being duely tested, I remain in your presence.
1 day13 hrs
  -> Apart from "habito" being commonly used in absolute ablatives ("consilio habito", "inspectione habita", etc.), where would the verb for "attended" be, were "se" a misreading for "si? How would you justify the ablative, if not with an absolute form, which?
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