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kråkeslott

English translation: rambling (old) house

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Norwegian term or phrase:kråkeslott
English translation:rambling (old) house
Entered by: Eivind Lilleskjaeret
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:38 Jul 4, 2003
Norwegian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Architecture / architecture
Norwegian term or phrase: kråkeslott
Hei, jeg trenger ett ord for "kråkeslott". Kunnskapsforlagets Engelsk stor ordbok har bare en forklaring: "building which is built in a higgledy-piggledy fashion"
Eivind Lilleskjaeret
Local time: 19:55
rambling (old) house
Explanation:
It does not have to be dilapidated, just built without a lot of plans, or added to at different periods.

a grand one might be 'a rambling old manor'
Selected response from:

Christine Andersen
Denmark
Local time: 19:55
Grading comment
beklager at det tok så lang tid :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5rambling (examples)Richard Lawson
5rambling (old) house
Christine Andersen
4old dilapidated manison
Sven Petersson
3rookerySara Hagelstam


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
rookery


Explanation:
Min Prisma Se>En föreslår detta, men jag är inte övertygad... eftersom Heritage dic säger:
NOUN: Inflected forms: pl. rook·er·ies
1a. A place where rooks nest or breed. b. A colony of rooks. 2. The breeding ground of certain other birds or animals, such as penguins and seals. 3. Informal A crowded and dilapidated tenement.

Sara Hagelstam
Local time: 19:55
Native speaker of: Swedish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terry Arness
15 mins

disagree  Marianne Dørumsgard: Native speakers I asked have never heard this use - neither have i!
7 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
old dilapidated manison


Explanation:
kråkeslott (no) > kråkslott (sv) > old dilapidated manison


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Note added at 25 mins (2003-07-04 11:04:15 GMT)
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If it has to be one word only I think \"ramshackle\" is the closest, but some of the meaning would get lost.


    Norstedts
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 19:55
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marianne Dørumsgard: I agree with "ramshackle", but it's really only used as an adjective, so put a noun after.
7 hrs
  -> :o)

disagree  Vedis Bjørndal: In my view it has less to do with being dilapidated - more to do with the building structure, ie an architect has not necessarily been involved
23 hrs
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
rambling (old) house


Explanation:
It does not have to be dilapidated, just built without a lot of plans, or added to at different periods.

a grand one might be 'a rambling old manor'

Christine Andersen
Denmark
Local time: 19:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
beklager at det tok så lang tid :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Richard Lawson: "Rambling" is commonly used in this context, and is an option with pleasant, positive associations. Other combinations are possible, e.g. "rambling architectural hodgepodge".
3 hrs

disagree  Marianne Dørumsgard: Native speakers still have no idea, but I don't have a better alternative, so..
6 hrs
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22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
rambling (examples)


Explanation:
In support of CRAndersen's suggestion, here are a few genuine examples of "rambling ...". Andersen and I are both native speakers of English.

I also think "rookery" might be an apt and amusing option (depending on the context).

On the bluff above us was Government House, a rambling architectural
hodgepodge, which was the official residence of the colonial governor from 1851
until Chris Patten, the last of the line, moved out. (Atlantic Monthly)

His house, a rambling late-nineteenth-century farmhouse .... (Metropolis)

His headquarters is in a ramblig old house that does not look as though it was
built to withstand the impact of a thousand army boots, (New Internationalist)

An old rambling house in down-town Albuquerque is the best place Alicia has
ever lived. (New Renaissance)

The couple then set off for his country house, Cahergillagh Court, a large
rambling building, where they are welcomed by an old housekeeper who is used as
the storyteller's confidante. (Cambridge History of English Literature, vol.
13)

Accordingly after tea Mrs. Rachel set out; she had not far to go; the big,
rambling, orchard-embowered house where the Cuthberts lived was a scant quarter
of a mile up the road from Lynde's Hollow. (Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables)

My case was practically complete, and there was only one small incident needed
to round it off. When, after considerable drive, we arrived at the strange old
rambling house which my client had described, it was Ralph, the elderly butler,
who opened the door. (Arthur Conan Doyle, Blanched Soldier)

Additions have been made to the original edifice from time to time, and great
alterations have taken place; towers and battlements have been erected during
wars and tumults: wings built in time of peace; and out-houses, lodges,
and offices, run up according to the whim or convenience of
different generations, until it has become one of that most spacious,
rambling tenements imaginable. (Washington Irving, John Bull)

when they reached the disorderly order of the long white rambling housebehind
Saharunpore, the lama took his own measures. (Kipling, Kim)

I have to keep up a considerable staff of servants at Hurlstone, for it is a
rambling old place and takes a good deal of looking after. (Arthur Conan Doyle,
Musgrave Ritual)

My earliest recollections of a school-life, are connected with a large,
rambling, Elizabethan house, in a misty-looking village of England, where were
a vast number of gigantic and gnarled trees, and where all the houses were
excessively ancient. (Edgar Allan Poe, William Wilson)



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Note added at 2003-07-05 10:53:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Native Competence

I would be wary of regarding native competence as an objective criterion, particularly as regards lexis. The majority of native speakers of English have a limited vocabulary and a poor command of the \"educated\" written language.

Native speakers may have a better feeling for the use of prepositions, word order, the distinction between \"some\" and \"any\", etc. without really knowing why. They may also generally be expected to have a broader knowledge of colloquial idiom and contemporary slang. However, a non-native speaker may well have a much better objective knowledge of the language and a vocabulary derived from wide reading in many fields. There are certainly examples of non-native speakers of English who are highly regarded for their contribution to English literature (e.g. Conrad), and some of the greatest English grammarians have been foreigners (e.g. Jespersen, Svartvik).

This being said, non-native speakers, however competent, rarely achieve a level of competence that enables them to completely avoid \"deviant\" usage, and professional translaters with foreign language background are well advised to have their work proofread by a native speaker.

Richard Lawson
Local time: 19:55
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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